WATCH: University of Limerick submarine robot investigates historical WW1 ship wrecks

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first_imgWhatsApp THE recently unveiled Irish National Monuments Service Wreck Viewer lists the locations of more than 4,000 shipwrecks from a total of 18,000 records of potential wrecks in Irish waters giving some indication of the available infrastructure on the seafloor.The discovery and high detailed survey of these shipwreck sites was possible for the first time through the technological innovations that the CRIS team have been trialling. The underwater vehicle control system, developed at UL, and funded by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI)  uses artificial intelligence (AI) and high powered computers for autonomous controls, enabling perception and the ability for the robot to evaluate situations independent of human help. These technologies unlock a high level of safety and awareness, which is essential for operating in difficult conditions such as shipwrecks and high weather areas off our coast.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Dr Gerard Dooly, chief scientist for the survey and deep wreck diver, said, “Close quarter inspection of these sites with an ROV is technically challenging and hazardous due to the presence of abandoned fishing gear.“The blended control and automation of the ROV provided by our UL developed OceanRINGS software and other UL systems allows us to safely complete these missions. Near the wreck, we saw pots and pans and unexploded ordinance (shells and primers) scattered on the seafloor reminding us of the human misfortune that occurred at the time of sinking.“Every wreck has its own story, so it’s always interesting to locate long forgotten shipwrecks and then try to determine the identity of the wreck and understand something of the circumstances of the tragedy.”Profiting from benign weather conditions at this time of year, the survey successfully located and dove on two large – greater than 100 metres in length – wrecks thought to be that of a Liner and a large cargo vessel and one smaller wreck which was found to be an operational WWI era U-boat. A high definition camera survey of one of the wrecks revealed that intact parts of the ship were colonised by various colourful epifauna: anemones, solitary corals, oysters and brachiopods.Subsequent multibeam mapping of one wreck, though to be that of the Ocean Liner S.S. Canadian, applying a newly published protocol on high-definition imaging of shipwrecks developed by the Centre for Maritime Archaeology (UUC) showed a large debris field that was not visible on the original map of the wreck, suggesting a violent impact with the seabed. Previous articleLimerick train journeys hit all time highNext articleCapital funding for 60-bed block unit at University Hospital Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSeducationhistoryNewsTechnology TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Twitter NewsEducationHeritageVideoWATCH: University of Limerick submarine robot investigates historical WW1 ship wrecksBy Staff Reporter – February 4, 2019 1421 Linkedin Email Facebookcenter_img Limerick on Covid watch list RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR O’Connells Butchers bringing a new element to customer service Print Advertisement Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Local backlash over Aer Lingus threatlast_img read more

TFA National Training Squads Announced

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first_imgJordan Marshall Dan Withers Trent Touma Kristy Brennan Jenna Hitch Nicole Beck Rachel Beck Matt Prowse Louise Winchester Scott Bundy Emily Hennessey Elin Mortimer Danielle Davis Sam Brisby Rob Nakhla Alicia Quirk Dylan Hennessey Touch Football Australia (TFA) is proud to announce its National Training Squads for the 2014 Trans Tasman Series against arch rivals New Zealand, which will take place in Mudgee, New South Wales in April, 2014.The Open teams (Men’s, Women’s and Mixed) will be looking to win back the prestigious Trans Tasman trophy following a loss to New Zealand in the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series, with the Women’s team the only side of the three to win their division.The squads consist of 18 players across the divisions yet to represent Australia at an Open’s level, with plenty of exciting up-and-coming talent selected in the squads following Australia’s Youth division clean sweep over New Zealand in the Super Trans Tasman Series. While there are some new faces in the squads, the teams will still contain a great deal of international experience, with the three Open’s teams combined comprising a total of more than 550 Australian Touch Football caps.Touch Football Australia wishes to congratulate the following players who have been named in the Australian squads: Patricia Michaelopolous Lizzie Campbell Jonathan Palau Oscar Sanft Cara Zaremski Michael Law Kirsty Quince Nick Good Jess McCall Laura Peattie Luke Tonegato Nicole McHugh Justin Mitchell Ben Moylan Adam Pryde Kristian Congoo Catherine Sargent Tim Good Peter Normancenter_img Women’s Open Michael Chapman Men’s Open Daniel Barton Steve Roberts Willie Bishop Simon Lang Stuart Brierty Kristin Boss Claire Winchester Peta Rogerson Melissa Peters Terry Deegan Ashleigh Quinlan Leah Percy Lawrence Oberleuter Rohit Prasad Dylan Thompson Matt Tope James Shute Charlotte Caslick Scott Buckley Marikki Watego Maddison Studdon Leah Opie Mixed Open Tim Glazebrook Sarah Spacie Kylie Hilder Sebe Rey Emilee Cherry Sarah Peattie Dean Springfield Kim Sue See Stay tuned to www.austouch.com.au for all of the latest news and information regarding the 2014 Trans Tasman Series. Related Filesnts_announcement_release_01-pdfRelated LinksNational Training Squadslast_img read more

Rep Griffin invites first responders to House Sept 11 ceremony

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first_img07Sep Rep. Griffin invites first responders to House Sept. 11 ceremony Categories: Griffin News,News PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Beth Griffin, of Mattawan, today hosted Van Buren County Sheriff Dan Abbott and Van Buren County Undersheriff Chad Hunt as her guests for the Michigan House’s annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the Capitol. The ceremony remembers first responders and members of the military from Michigan who died in the line of duty in the past year.last_img read more

Ofcom has removed regulation that requires Sky to

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The family has always disputed British Army claims

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Click on image to enlarge The sleek tilebase

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first_img (Click on image to enlarge) The sleek, tile-based interface is meant to work on touch screens that vary in size from phone to wall uses. And all at the tip of your fingers. The multi-touch revolution is literally remaking the computer as we know it. And more and more often, users – children especially – will be able to simply eschew the mouse and even the keyboard. That’s because it’s not just touch that Microsoft is eyeing. The same gesture and voice technologies that control the Xbox will also be brought to Windows 8 as well. The company already produces a Kinect for Windows, and hackers have been busy working on connecting the device to older versions of Windows and to a whole host of other devices, including robots: The arrival of the Tandy was the moment we went from a family without a computer to a family with one. I look back at it, and I like to think it compares to the arrival of the first television set in many households in the 1940s and 1950s. The family gathered around the set to watch Ed Sullivan, neighbors aglow with jealousy. We were by no means the first on the block to own a computer. Still, at that stage many a family didn’t yet have one. Maybe Dad or Mom used one at work, and of course, our small suburban school had a little “lab” of them, used to mainly to teach typing. So I’d used them before, on occasion, but the power of the device – and my borderline addiction to it – was not apparent until it invaded the home. Or at least my home (there is probably a good “nature vs. nurture” debate in the evolution of the computer geek). But it wasn’t much like the arrival of the television at all. I only found out years later that my mother had to work hard to convince my father that it was more than his choice description – “a $3,000 pet rock.” We never huddled around the phosphorescent glow of the screen as a family. My brother ignored it nearly entirely (maybe that was only because I hogged it?). The same was true for the majority of children in the original group of digital natives: the computer was part of, but mostly peripheral to, the average child’s life. It was only a select set who really made it a part of their everyday lives. Yet today that seems to have changed, simply by the ubiquity thrust upon the current generation of children. Computers, in the looser definition of the word that includes smart phones, tablets, traditional PCs, interactive video players, GPS devices, game consoles, and a host of other consumer and business tools and toys, are everywhere. Our car stereos become speakerphones and road maps on demand. We even use touchscreens to order lunch at deli chains and burrito joints. Living a day free of interaction with a computer is now much more difficult than it was for the first digital cohort. Quantifying the impact of this generational shift is difficult, if not downright impossible. But we can garner quite a bit of insight from the anecdotal experiences we have with our own children today. I am a father of two wonderful sons, ages four and six. As you can imagine, given my geekish tendencies and a career centered on being up to date on some of the most advanced technologies around, my home is replete with the latest gadgets – everything from the run-of-the-mill consumer electronics to quad copters and 3D printers. Amongst the most prized of those gadgets (from the perspective of my six-year-old at least) are the video game consoles. We have a Wii, a Playstation, and most notably for this story, an Xbox with the Kinect attachment, hooked into the surprisingly modest-sized television in the living room. (I’ve never been a prime time TV or sports addict, so a TV bigger than the 37-inch LCD is one of those things I occasionally think of grabbing, but never bother to.) For those of you unfamiliar with it, the Xbox with Kinect allows you to eschew the traditional joystick and instead use gestures to control the game. No controllers. No remotes. Just stand in front of the three-eyed digital camera contraption and it senses where your head, heads, feet, etc., are and where they are moving to. The resulting paths of motion are translated by the console into swipes that slide content along the screen, kicks that send virtual soccer balls flying, and (thanks to some munificent math by game designers) Olympic-record-breaking long jumps you’d never be capable of in real life. The Kinect is not the only sensing device on the market. The video below highlights another one, the Leap Motion: Or consider the iPhone, which is the number-one selling phone in the world, hands down. Its next closest competitors virtually all sport touchscreens as well. Now, 50% of all phones sold in the US are smartphones, and virtually all are powered by touchscreen interfaces. But iPad- and iPhone-like touch-based devices are just supplements for most households in the developed world (in developing nations, like most in Africa and large swaths of Asia, increasing numbers of households count their smartphones as the first and sole computing device). In the West, the touchscreen-centric devices add to their owners’ computers, but still rarely wholesale replace them. The Western world, even at home, is still dominated by Windows and traditional Macs. However, recently Microsoft announced that its Windows 8 desktop operating system, due out this fall, will be fully touch enabled. In other words, its interface will look much more like the iPhone than it does the traditional Windows interface hundreds of millions of people know today. In fact, it will look exactly like the interface on the new Windows phones, dubbed “Metro.” By Alex Daley, Casey Research This video shows the power of these devices firsthand. Like the Kinect, like the multi-touch screens of the iPhone, iPad, Androids, and other devices, the Leap Motion captures far more than just the location of a single dot. Instead it maps a wide variety of motions onto a map of intended actions. It attempts to allow for natural gestures to become the language in which we communicate with our computers. It’s not uncommon these days for kids to experience computing without the traditional tethers of keyboard and mouse, or even remote controls and game controllers. These novel, unwired interfaces are not only coming to market, they are on the verge of becoming ubiquitous. Take another keyboard- and mouse-free device for instance: the iPad. Just a little over two years after its introduction, the touchscreen-centric iPad is the number-one selling non-phone personal computer in the world. It outsells – in sheer volume of units shipped – the total of all computers shipped by any one of the top PC makers in the world: HP, Dell, Lenovo, etc. That’s all their many models of desktops and laptops rolled into one: My son doesn’t know how to use a mouse. He doesn’t even know what one is. As far as he’s concerned, it’s a furry animal he’s only seen in books and running around the floor of the Newark airport. While I’ve known this for some time, it recently moved from the back of my mind to front and center following a brief car trip a few days ago. From the back seat, my eldest son – who for some inexplicable reason loves to watch the instructions tick by on the screen of the GPS unit sitting on the dashboard – requested that I program the unit to give us directions home. I politely declined, pointing out that I couldn’t be messing around with the screen as I was already driving. He followed up with that well-known, youthful naïveté that borders on soul-piercing in its effectiveness to point our shortcomings in ourselves and our world by asking: “Why can’t you just tell it where you want to go? Like the Xbox.” “I don’t know, son…” Unhappy with the answer he’d received, the conversation then turned in the direction of endless questions about computers versus video games versus the car’s GPS. In all the hubbub of explaining to my eldest about the differences between them, especially how we interact with them, my youngest, despite spending many an hour on particularly snowy Vermont days upstairs in the home office playing Curious George games on the computer, piped in abruptly: “Dad! Why would your computer have a mouse in it?! You’re just making that up!” A lot has been made over the past few years of so-called “digital natives” – children who were born and raised in the age of the computer. Kids like Mark Zuckerberg, who was born in 1984, seven years after the release of Apple’s first computer. For all of his life (and mine; if I’m being honest, I’m not that much older than Zuck), computers have been part of human existence. We were both part of the first digital generation. But still, even then the computer was something distinct from everyday life. It was culturally defining. It was epochal, some might even say. But it was by no means universally prevalent. One of my fondest childhood memories is of the arrival of a fresh, new Tandy 1000 SL one Christmas morning. I remember it well. 50-odd lb., 13-inch CRT monitor. Big honking base “CPU.” Keyboard… and no mouse. That came later, with the next-generation model. With devices like the Leap Motion following the Kinect, gestures may someday become as common as the touchscreen is today. You’ll be able to use your machine’s microphone to control it as well. Microsoft already brought speech recognition to cars with Ford and Fiat’s infotainment systems, and now it plans to make it ubiquitous in every device it touches. We’ve just begun what promises to be a wholesale revolution in the way we interact with computers, as big or larger than the introduction of the mouse and graphical user interface, yet already, the first crop of these devices is beginning to change the entire way we think about interacting with computers, from top to bottom. First, it’s not that we have “a” computer; we now have multiple computers. And they carry names like “phone,” “tablet,” and “Xbox.” With each, we touch the screens, talk to them, wave at them, and expect them to understand what we’re doing. Increasingly, they even interact back with us through speech or by navigating our physical world. By the time my sons reach 8 and 10 – I was 10 when I received my Tandy, which came standard with a 256-color video graphics setup that I thought was pretty awesome at the time – the term “click here” will have about as much personal relevance to them as “turning” the channel or “dialing” the telephone. The fact that I had to “sit down at the keyboard” to type up this message is even a half-truth. I’ve been bitten by the speech recognition bug, and the majority of what you read here was spoken aloud to my computer, which did the typing for me, whilst I paced around my office. For me, that’s still novel. But for my sons, who have known nothing different in their short lives, gestures and voice controls and touchscreens are so common that they now expect as much from every new device they encounter. To them, it makes no sense that they cannot just talk to the GPS (something which, now that it’s been pointed out to me, seems equally preposterous given its position inside the car where inevitably both of my hands will be otherwise occupied at the 10 and 2 positions on the steering wheel). The touchscreen is for them – sons of a geek – the lowest common denominator. Everything does that. Speech? Gestures? Why not? User interface expectations are built very early on. Painted on the blank canvas that is a screen, they often come to be based on metaphors we know from our previous lives.  Once comfortable with the way things work, it takes a pretty large benefit for us to change our behaviors (if that were not the case, the iPad onscreen keypad would have used the Dvorak layout, which has been proven time and again more efficient for typers than the QWERTY keyboard, which was invented to minimize mechanical movement and thus repairs of mechanical typewriters – like the metric system for most American people, it’s just not enough better to make it worth even considering). It is likely for this exact reason that, despite my penchant for gadgets, we still live in an iPad-free household. It’s because Dad (i.e., me this time) doesn’t like the thing. I find it terribly constrained. I cannot bear to type on the screen. There’s no easy way to position the screen to a good angle. But most of all, I hate not having a file system where I can download a presentation and leaf through it, making small changes, adding slides, etc. The idea that a computer doesn’t contain folders and files is as foreign to me as the lack of voice control in the car’s GPS system is to my sons. Luckily, as one of the technological one-percenters from my own, original digital-age group, adjusting is easier for me than for most. I almost never thumb in a message on my Android phone. I rely instead on the excellent voice recognition built in (I only wish there was a button on the phone to hold to put it into voice mode, like on the iPhone). I use the Kinect voice controls regularly… so much so that given the choice between hopping around the nice “Metro” interface of the Xbox with my voice commands and trying to surf through cable channels, I end up watching “reruns” (another of those archaeologically rooted technical terms) on Netflix, via the Xbox, every single time. (Bonus: I never have to find that darned remote again!) My youngest son, sneaking upstairs for some additional fun with Curious George’s online games, has (largely unnoticed by me until now) made the same choice with the computer in my office. He’s elected to exclusively use the giant touchscreen I installed up there – as a geeky thing for me to explore and mostly never use – as his sole input device. To him, the mouse on the desk might as well be the furry little creature, as it is has just as little to do with the computer as its mammalian namesake. No, for my two young sons, their Tandy moment will not involve a black screen with blinking cursor. They may not even have a Tandy moment; or they may have had many much smaller ones already. Maybe, just maybe, they may never even know what it’s like to understand a colossal leap forward in technology stepping into their lives seemingly overnight. After all, for them, computing is already an immersive experience – one where you interact with dozens of devices, each purpose-built for its task, each designed to work around you, rather than you having to bend to their somewhat quirky and limited means of interaction. While members of my generation were the original “digital natives,” things will look much different viewed through the eyes of our own children. What to expect of computers has changed in a seeming flash. But still, the geek in me knows deep down that it is precisely because many of the most inclined in their generation – like me, Zuck, and millions of others in the prior age cohort – will be as frustrated by the limitations of what today’s adults dreamt up that they too will work to throw them out and replace them with something even further, inspired not by Star Trek, whose vision of the user computer interface wasn’t much beyond what’s in the Xbox and iPad, but maybe by Ready Player One… or even Harry Potter. The implications of this trend loom large for investors as well. The new paradigm for computing is about natural interaction. And any company that ignores it will ultimately limit its market going forward. PCs ate the mainframe. The Blackberry destroyed the mobile phone. The iPhone wiped out the Blackberry. The Xbox trounced the Wii. What will the next major shift in the interface bring? Time will tell, but our experiences thus far suggest the mouse will likely play a lesser role, and our hands, voices, and maybe even just our minds will play a much larger one. I’m excitedly awaiting the arrival on my doorstep of a novel “learning” thermostat (yes, I’m that kind of geek). Just adjust the temperature by turning the dial as you go in and out, as you wake and get ready to sleep, and it learns your patterns, creating a constantly adapting program to both make you comfortable and save energy. It adjusts to weekends – it knows what date and time it is. The weather – it knows where you live. When you aren’t home – it has motion sensors. Cool stuff. But when it arrives, I am sure my son will ask why I have to “turn the dial” in the first place. Why can’t I just tell it to make it cooler? Why not, indeed… As amazing as these advances are, they all are driven by the brilliant individuals whose visionary dreams guide their work. To be in on the companies most likely to survive the stiff competition in tech, an investor must understand this and keep up with the ever-shifting front lines of the tech wars.last_img read more

Of course it was silver that really got it in the

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The American celebrity Blac Chyna came to Lagos N

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first_imgThe American celebrity Blac Chyna came to Lagos, Nigeria, on Nov. 25 to promote a product she is launching: “X Blac Chyna Diamond Illuminating and Lightening Cream.” It’s from the cosmetics company Whitenicious, a skin care line that has been controversial since its launch in 2014.The new cream comes in a crystal-adorned jar and sells for $250 for 100 grams — about 3.5 ounces. That’s a far higher price than for other skin-lightening products found in small pharmacies and shops along streets. Promotional material for the cream, like the image shown above, creates an image of glamour to appeal to a high-end audience.The company says the product “restores, illuminates, tightens, firms and moisturizes the face.”Blac Chyna is partnering with a Cameroonian singer, Dencia, who started Whitenicious. The name of the company itself has received criticism for seeming to equate whiteness with beauty. In an interview with Britain’s Channel 4 in 2014, Dencia stated that the “white” in Whitenicious means “pure.”As for the high price for Blac Chyna’s cream, Dencia defends it, calling the cream a luxury product.The market for skin-lightening creams in Nigeria is big — according to a 2011 report by the World Health Organization, 77 percent of Nigerian women use skin-lightening products. As in other parts of the world, the reason is often a perceived social bias against darker-skinned women.There is the potential for side effects with some lighteners. They can contain mercury, steroids and high levels of hydroquinine, which can lead to problems like skin thinning, blisters and acne. Some countries, including Nigeria, have banned the use of such ingredients in cosmetic products. Whitenicious states that none of these ingredients are in its products.Blac Chyna’s visit wasn’t just about promoting the cream. Coinciding with her visit, Whitenicious opened its first store in Lagos, with Dencia and Blac Chyna in attendance. Blac Chyna, who was born Angela Renée White in Washington, D.C., also visited an orphanage in Lagos and made a donation. But in news coverage and on social media, this was overshadowed by the launch of her face cream.Amid the hoopla, conversations on skin bleaching and beauty standards sprang up in every corner.The role of Blac Chyna in the product launch is a very deliberate choice, says Shingi Mtero, a lecturer at Rhodes University who teaches a course on the politics of skin bleaching.”African-American culture really does have a big influence on black African culture,” says Mtero.Mtero also points out that there are misconceptions about why people in Africa bleach their skin. There’s a difference between using products to, say, correct skin conditions such as acne scarring and uneven skin tone, and products that lighten skin by several shades.”There’s an assumption that people who bleach their skin are irrational,” she says. But she does not believe that is the case: “Black women who bleach their skin believe that it will give them access and power. They think through their decision.”In post-colonial Africa, there is still a premium on light skin, says Mtero. “Whiteness is something that many Africans aspire to, and light skin still has social capital.”As long as light skin represents social capital and privilege, she says, she believes skin bleaching will remain popular — and profitable for celebrities like Dencia and Blac Chyna.Mako Muzenda is a freelance journalist and blogger from Zimbabwe. She is now studying in South Africa at Rhodes University. Reach her @MGMuzenda Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Copyright 2018 NPR To see more visit httpswww

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first_imgCopyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img

Intel Pledges 125 Million for Startups That Back Women Minorities

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