Rethink. Reset. Recycle.

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first_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSOrange County Commissioner Bryan Nelson Previous articleMissing Orlando girl found in Las VegasNext articlePuerto Rican leaders declare Florida Hospital physicians ‘heroes’ Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 From Orange County Commissioner Bryan NelsonIn last week’s column, I discussed one of two important work sessions that took place during the morning session of the March 6th meeting of the Orange County Board of County Commissioners: The Wekiva Basin Management Action Plan (BMAP). This week, I would like to discuss the second of those work sessions: An update on Orange County’s Recycling Collection Program. The presentation, given by Utilities Section Manager of the Solid Waste Division David Gregory, gave a little more background information on the program since the last update given in December; actions taken since the last update; the program itself being developed; and recycling options that will take place after June 30, 2018.Orange County Commissioner Bryan NelsonWith more attention being given to the contamination and recycling issue, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has created a statewide recycling improvement initiative called “Rethink. Reset. Recycle.” The purpose of the program is to educate Florida residents about what should be placed in their recycling carts (aluminum and steel cans, plastic bottles and jugs, paper and cardboard, etc.) vs. what should not be placed in their recycling carts (clothes, food, plastic bags, tanglers, etc.), and how to recycle them properly. Items should be cleaned and dried prior to being placed in to the recycling bin. In addition, the following items should not be recycled curbside: Plastic bags; clothing; bubble wrap and styrofoam; cords, hoses and holiday lights; and pizza boxes and carry-out containers. Residents can help educate their fellow neighbors on how to recycle properly, where if several neighbors do not recycle properly, an entire load of recycling can be contaminated; when in doubt about whether an item is recyclable or not, residents should throw it out in their regular trash. By eliminating the 30% of contaminated materials in curbside recycling bins, Florida taxpayers could save $100 million in recycling costs in a year. Orange County staff collected data on the value of recyclable commodities (price per ton) for February 2018 for the following sources: Aluminum cans cost $1,450 ($1,353.10 in February 2014); Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) plastic cost $280 ($350 in February 2014); High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) plastic cost $315 ($610 in February 2014); and cardboard cost $105 ($115.31 in February 2014). According to The Aluminum Association, “Recycling aluminum saves more than 90 percent of the energy costs required in primary production. Aluminum is 100 percent recyclable, making the metal one of the most recyclable of all materials. Recycled aluminum retains its properties indefinitely and is the only material in the consumer disposal stream that more than pays for the cost of its own collection” (Source: http://www.aluminum.org/aluminum-advantage/economic-impact-aluminum). Additionally, according to “Recycling Economics: A Cost-Benefit Analysis”, “Recycling aluminum…can reduce energy consumption by as much as 95%. Savings for other materials are lower, but still substantial: about 70% for plastics, 60% for steel, 40% for paper, and 30% for glass. (1) In all cases, the energy savings are significant and well worth the effort to recover them” (Source: http://blog.recology.com/2015/04/28/recycling-economics-a-cost-benefit-analysis/). For more information on this initiative, residents can go to the following link: http://floridarecycles.org/.Orange County is currently working on a recycling improvement program. In the Florida Legislature, House Bill 1149 (substituted for Senate Bill 1308), had it passed during the 2018 Legislative Session, would have required any local government and private contractor to have a recycling processing agreement, identify what is excessively contaminated and the steps to improve this contamination level. The key elements that came out of the staff analysis of the research and interviews conducted included the following: The need for a coordinated education; curbside feedback; and persistence and follow-up to ensure the long-term success of the program. Orange County Utilities believes that the program should include 3 areas: Administration; communication and outreach; and field education and enforcement. The administration element will provide program management, composition studies, and measurements for improvement. Additionally, the communication and outreach element will utilize various tools to reach out to the community: Direct mail, social media, community papers, and Homeowner’s Associations (HOAs). Furthermore, the field education and enforcement element will provide recycling field representatives, who will conduct cart checks to ensure residents are recycling properly; this element includes both positive (a thank you note on their cart for recycling properly, etc.) and negative (tagging for not recycling properly, not collecting cart, eventual cart removal after 3 tags, etc.) enforcement. The Solid Waste Division plans to propose a pilot program, experimenting on a small-scale on what methods work best, and further developing the program from there.Residents should keep in mind that the Orange County Code requires recycling. For more information on Orange County’s Automated Curbside Collection Program, including a collection schedule, instructions, and items that can/cannot be recycled, residents can go to the following link:  http://www.ocfl.net/WaterGarbageRecycling/GreenClean.aspx. For questions or concerns, residents can contact the Solid Waste Hotline at (407) 836-6601 or [email protected] December, the Solid Waste Division has extended its current recycling contract through June 30, 2018. In addition, the staff has also spent a significant amount of time researching other initiatives in Florida as well as across the nation that addresses contamination and increasing recycling rates. Furthermore, the staff has worked with collection companies and our recycling processor to identify, on a neighborhood and route-by-route level, where the best opportunities for recycling could take place.The Solid Waste Division has evaluated and considered 3 processing options for managing recyclables after June 30, 2018: Short-term routing of recyclables to the landfill for disposal; sending recyclables to a waste-to-energy facility, and extending the current processing contract. The current processor is open to the idea of extending the current agreement under terms and conditions similar to the ones in place now. Looking at the potential costs of each option, staff found that their costs would go from $220 to: $235 for landfilling recyclables; $240 for sending recyclables to a waste-to-energy facility; and $230 for extending the current processing contract. Based on their analysis, the staff has decided to extend the current contract given that the current processor is open to an extension and to offer the best value for recycling to Orange County residents.Residents who wish to watch the full presentation from the Board Meeting may do so here: http://netapps.ocfl.net/Mod/meetings/1. Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

McIlroy wants no worries for 2017

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first_imgRory McIlroy says it’s a little off-putting not knowing what golf clubs he’ll be using next year.His current sponsor recently announced it would be ceasing its equipment operation.The Northern Irishman has one tournament left this season, with the Tour Championship in Dubai starting on Thursday. He tells Sky Sports News he wants to go into 2017 with everything set in stone.last_img

Salvation Army Still in Need of Coat Donations for Next Week’s Coat Giveaway

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisThe weather outside is already showing signs of an early winter, that’s why the Salvation Army is currently accepting donations for their annual coat drive.Coats, hats, gloves and all warm items are still needed. Organizer Amy Cedervall said any size would be accepted. This year the Salvation Army is hoping to get larger sizes especially for men.The annual coat giveaway will be held Tuesday, October 23 at 722 N. 2nd Ave, Alpena from 10 am until 2 pm.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious What’s Trending on October 18Next Girls on the Run in Need of Volunteer Coaches for 2019last_img read more

Leafs acquire former Coyote defenceman as junior teams finalize rosters

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first_imgThe Nelson Leafs beefed up the blue line with the acquisition of Robson Cramer from Wichita Falls of the NAHL (North American Hockey League) as Kootenay International Junior Hockey League teams scrambled to finalize teams in light of Thursday’s BC Hockey roster deadline.Cramer, from Summerland, is no stranger to the KIJHL having spent two seasons with Osoyoos Coyotes before being moved south of the 49th parallel in November.“(Robson) is an offensive guy who can quarterback our player play and give us some depth on the blue line,” said Leaf coach Frank Maida of the former Coyote.Thursday was the final day junior teams could add players to the roster.Maida has been working the phones of late looking for a defenceman and forward to bolster a lineup that has played second fiddle of late to Murdoch rivals Castlegar Rebels and Beaver Valley Nitehawks.The Leafs are 0-3 against the two Murdoch rivals since mid-December.The 5’10”, 150-pound Cramer played 17 games for Osoyoos before being shipped to Wichita Falls November 20 for future considerations.Maida is confident the addition of Cramer gives Nelson a bit of a cushion on the blue line.“Robson should strengthen the back end,” Maida explained. “I’m satisfied now with our goaltending and we can score goals so I feel now we’re ready for the most exciting time of the season, the playoffs.”The addition of Cramer gives the Leafs nine defenceman on the roster. However, Nelson Minor Hockey grad Blake Arcuri is still recovering from a concussion suffered before Christmas in Spokane.Cramer makes it three new players on the roster for the Leafs. During the Christmas break Maida dealt for Grand Forks leading scorer Connor Gross to fill the void created by the loss of Colton McCarthy to Moose Jaw of the WHL.The Nelson skipper then shipped goalie Cody Boeckman to Golden before grabbing former Leaf Marcus Beesley from Kamloops.Earlier Maida sent disgruntled forward Jacob Boyczuk to Revelstoke Grizzlies for future considerations.Where Nelson will finish in the tight Murdoch Division is anyone’s guess.The Leafs currently lead the division by two points over Castlegar and Beaver Valley, although the Hawks have played two more games.The Rebels were in Grand Forks Thursday to face the last place Bruins.Nelson, 2-3-1 in the last six games, completes a five-game road trip this weekend with a swing through the Okanagan Division.Friday Nelson visits Chase Heat before travelling to face Kamloops Storm Saturday.The Leafs conclude the trip Sunday in Armstrong against the North Okanagan Knights.Nelson returns home January 18 to host Columbia Valley Rockies at 7 p.m. in thelast_img read more

Arcata makes statement in Big 5 race with rout of Fortuna

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first_imgFortuna >> In a game that pitted the perennial league champions against a home team that was on a 12-game winning streak, the Arcata Tigers left little doubt as to which team is the one to beat in the Humboldt-Del Norte League Big 5 this season. The Tigers used an 11-2 run to start the second quarter and a 7-0 to begin the second half to cruise to a 60-43 victory over the Fortuna Huskies in a Big 5 first-place match-up on Friday at Fortuna High School.“We came out really prepared. We knew …last_img read more

Astrobiology Has No Bio

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first_imgThe confidence in each of these articles that life can originate by chance is challenged by the complete lack of evidence that it happened that way.  This is all “strong astrobiology,” expecting life by chance and speculating on how it happened, with heavy use of promissory notes and a high perhapsimaybecouldness index.Ever since Darwin speculated about some “warm little pond” where life may have originated by chance, the search for life by chance has grown and become more detailed and technical.  Now we have high-temperature ovens, impact guns, and spark chambers.  Nothing ever grows out of the test tubes.  The empirical data is inversely proportional to the hope and hype in the media.  That story about oil in water (#6 above) is unbelievably stupid; it’s like staring at a Lava Lamp and calling it alive.  Read with astonishment what a “science” news site reported without laughing out loud:The researchers’ robot used a video camera to monitor, process and analyse the behaviour of 225 differently-composed droplets, identifying a number of distinct characteristics such as vibration or clustering.The team picked out three types of droplet behaviour – division, movement and vibration – to focus on in the next stage of the research. They used the robot to deposit populations of droplets of the same composition, then ranked these populations in order of how closely they fit the criteria of behaviour identified by the researchers. The chemical composition of the ‘fittest’ population was then carried over into a second generation of droplets, and the process of robotic selection was begun again. [This is artificial selection—intelligent design, imposing investigator interference and anthropomorphism on lifeless matter.]Over the course of 20 repetitions of the process, the researchers found that the droplets became more stable, mimicking the natural selection of evolution.Good grief.  The most outrageous lapses of empirical science get a pass if they support evolution in some way.Let’s recall the days of alchemy: this was a long-lasting inquiry into nature.  Like astrobiologists, alchemists believed with all their heart that base metals “could” be turned into gold.  The quest lasted for centuries.  Techniques were devised that later proved helpful to “real” chemistry.  But alchemy failed, and always failed, year after year, century after century, even though its practitioners believed strongly they were making progress.  They kept hope alive with the belief that a breakthrough was just around the corner.  (Actually, using atom smashers, it can now be done, at far more cost than any yield of gold.)  In hindsight, alchemy was a fruitless quest.  It was not science.  Astrobiology now seems to be in that early euphoric stage.  Its hopes are misguided, when one considers the impossibility of getting life by chance (see our online book).Take the “bio” out of astrobiology, and what do you get?  Astrology—a method of divination.  Look at these news articles above and explain if you see any real philosophical difference.(Visited 67 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 When you take the “bio” out of astrobiology, what do you get?  Is it still a science?Astrobiology as a new branch of science was launched in 1996 at the announcement of possible life fossils in a Martian meteorite (NASA).  18 years later, there is still no biology in astrobiology, despite highly-publicized, optimistic research attempts to figure out the origin of life without an intelligent designer.One might describe two kinds of astrobiology.  “Weak” astrobiology (our term) attempts to understand the requirements for life to exist on a planet.  This is empirical science, and can help us understand life on Earth—i.e., what would happen if Earth did not meet these requirements.  Observations can be made of where life exists on Earth in extreme environments, and experiments can be done with microbes to see what happens if certain requirements are reduced or eliminated.  “Strong” astrobiology expects that life is common in the universe (because it’s here on this planet, assuming our planet is nothing special): we just need to find it.  It also is heavily dependent on origin-of-life experiments.  This kind of astrobiology, so far, has failed miserably.Here are recent news items about astrobiology’s search for life or the origin of life.  As becomes obvious from headlines, the word “could” is prominent.  Progress is always promised out in the future somewhere.Nuclear fragments could help uncover the origins of life-supporting planets (PhysOrg): “Our study essentially demonstrates how star dust – the remnants of exploded stars – plays a role in the formation of life-supporting planets,” say researchers from the University of Surrey.  “It is just one discovery in a long process, but it will pave the way for further work in understanding the conditions needed for life in the universe.”From Hell on Earth: Life’s Building Blocks (Science Magazine): “Ancient asteroid impacts may have kick-started life on Earth” say researchers in the Czech Republic. Under controlled lab conditions at extreme temperature and pressure, they found the 4 bases of DNA in clay spiked with formamide.  “Could” is used 4 times in Sid Perkins’ article, and “may” twice.  See also New Scientist.  The coverage on Live Science points back to the Miller spark-discharge experiment.Cosmic Impacts Might Help Synthesize Organic Compounds (Astrobiology Magazine): Some organic compounds “could” survive impacts, experiments with projectiles fired at organic-enriched ices show.  “Future research could also focus on creating icy projectiles that better match the composition of comets.”Ponds or pounding are both possible origins for life (New Scientist):”If the Rosetta result holds up, we’ll have to explain why we haven’t seen more comets with heavy water” (see 12/11/14). But if impacts forged nucleic acid bases, well then: “It’s a long way from life, but our own kind of big bang may have sparked it.”Young, hotheaded stars could host habitable worlds (New Scientist): This article speculates that M-dwarf stars “could” have hosted life early in their careers (but see 12/06/14).  “That may be enough time for life to develop and then go underground or underwater to survive as the star cools.”Chemists create ‘artificial chemical evolution’ for the first time (PhysOrg):”Scientists have taken an important step towards the possibility of creating synthetic life with the development of a form of artificial evolution in a simple chemistry set without DNA.” This is crazy: they watched oil droplets “evolve” in water. “Droplets of oil move in water like primitive chemical machines, transferring chemical energy to kinetic energy.”  But where is a genetic code and signaling networks?  Where is accurate replication?  “This is the first time that an evolvable chemical system has existed outside of biology,” a professor at the U of Glasgow claims.Giant impacts, planet formation and the search for life elsewhere (The Conversation): article agrees that moon is finely tuned, habitability is tenuous, and that impacts can be devastating, but keeps hope alive.  “The future will doubtless reveal more factors that must be taken into account when assessing the suitability of a given planetary system as a host for life,” three evolutionists speculate.last_img read more

Photo library: Tourism and leisure 13

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first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Qunu, Eastern Cape province: A replica of the Robben Island cell in which Nelson Mandela was imprisoned, at the Nelson Mandela Museum. Mandela grew up in the village of Qunu. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Qunu, Eastern Cape province: A display with a photo of the Robben Island prison, at the Nelson Mandela Museum. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image TOURISM AND LEISURE 13:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

SA debt at sustainable levels: Gordhan

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first_img23 October 2013 South Africa’s debt-to-GDP ratio remains sustainable, despite having risen from 23% of gross domestic product in 2007/8 to 39.3% of GDP in 2013/14, Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan told Parliament on Wednesday. Presenting his medium term budget policy statement in Cape Town, Gordhan said that South Africa’s net debt was expected to reach 43.9% of GDP in 2016/17, but assured those that have loaned the country money that its debt had not reached unsustainable levels. He pointed that the International Monetary Fund (IMF), in a recent assessment of the country, had reached the same conclusion. At the same time, he said, the government was committed to rebuilding fiscal space by stabilising and then reducing the country’s debt-to-GDP ratio. This, he said, would allow government to respond to future economic shocks by bringing down spending on debt-service costs and creating countercyclical borrowing opportunities. South Africa’s budget deficit is expected to come in at 4.2% for 2013/14, declining slightly to 4.1% in 2014/15 before falling to three percent in 2016/17. While the budget deficit in the 2013 Budget was forecast as 4.6%, the 4.2% deficit is based on a new formula for government accounts which is in line with IMF provisions and includes extraordinary receipts and extraordinary payments in the calculation of the deficit. The borrowing requirement for the main budget is projected to increase from R168.5-billion in 2013/14 to R183.9-billion in 2014/15 before declining to R164.9-billion in 2016/17. Interest payments are the fastest growing expenditure item over the next three years, growing to R140-billion in 2016/17 – higher than current spending on health care. Compensation of public servants now accounts for 39.4% of the budget of non-interest spending and will continue to outpace inflation, but grow at a slower rate than over the past three years. Gordhan said the government’s debt management strategy over the next three years would focus on minimising refinancing risk accommodate redemptions. The government would also continue to build cash reserves and continue to switch from short-term to longer-term debt as market conditions allowed, he said. The government’s contingency reserve is projected to grow from R3-billion in 2014/15 to R6-billion in 2015/16, climbing to R18-billion in 2016/17. The contingency reserve has been reduced from R7.5-billion over the next two years to respond to spending pressures. As part of careful measures to restrict spending, Gordhan said state-owned companies would be expected to borrow on the strength of their balance sheets, rather than be funded from the fiscus. If capitalisation of the state’s core assets was required, state-owned entities would have to consider upfront disposal of non-core assets, while those state-owned companies that faced persistent difficulties would have to undergo operational restructuring, he said. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Guns and glory

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first_imgCapt. Amarinder SinghPunjab continues to shoot on target with the best ranges, tournaments and, of course, the veterans. With well-equipped shooting ranges, the gun fans have been winning laurels for quite some time now. Their love of shooting comes from their families with a hunting tradition and they are taking,Capt. Amarinder SinghPunjab continues to shoot on target with the best ranges, tournaments and, of course, the veterans. With well-equipped shooting ranges, the gun fans have been winning laurels for quite some time now. Their love of shooting comes from their families with a hunting tradition and they are taking the sport to a professional level.Yuvraj Raninder Singh, the scion of the Patiala Royal family, has set a new template for other shooters in his ilk to emulate. The President of the National Rifle Association of India (NRAI) and the Chairman of Punjab Rifle Association of India, Singh is the brain behind India’s best equipped shooting range. Having conceptualised the New Moti Bagh Gun Club (NMBGC) in 2006, he expanded it in 2009. Today, it is among the best-equipped ranges in the country that complies with international standards.Setting up a shooting range was a childhood dream for Singh, as he says, “You could say I was born into guns.” He learnt the basics of shooting with an air gun when he was seven. “I developed interest in the sport, my uncle Raja Randhir Singh took me under his wing. The Secretary General of the International Olympics Association and the winner of a gold medal in Trap Shooting at the 1982 Asian games, my uncle taught me the power of diligence, practice and focus needed in this sport.”Members of NMBGCEventually, Singh participated in the International Shooting Sport Federation World Cups and National Championships and holds the 6th position as a trap shooter in India. But his true calling was setting up a state-of-theart shooting range, “Punjabis worship and treasure their weapons like jewellery. Shooting is in our genes and if amateurs are trained well, we’ll make the best shooters in the world. So, I developed this range for Punjabis but consequently, shooters from Uttaranchal and UP are also coming here,” says Singh.His father Capt. Amarinder Singh, the current Maharaja of Patiala, had set up the original Patiala Gun club in the eighties, “It was a motley group of about 35 shooting enthusiasts from the region. But it has now expanded to 200 members. The club is now planning to host international events in the future,” says Amarinder, the club’s President. Yuvraj Raninder SinghSpread across 3.5 acres of land (in the Ghaggar flood area), the entire facility has three combined trap, skeet and double trap ranges (as per ISSF regulations). Elaborates Guddu Sandhu, treasurer of the club, “We have imported our voice-activated shooting machinery from Serena in Italy, where they make the best ones for the sport. Our ammunition has been imported by the NRAI. We provide our members with these on a no profit no loss basis.”The club also organises specialised coaching for upcoming member shooters once a year. But Singh plans to take this further, “Once we aren’t constrained by the amount of ammunition in our stock, we’ll have broad-based coaching camps open to all.”The club does have a lounge but no elaborate eating facilities are provided. “This is intentional as the club house is oriented to cater to the use of shooters and not towards socialising. Our aim is to concentrate only on the shooting sport activity,” says Parampal smilingly. Fact fileNMBGC successfully hosted the XIX GV Mavlankar All India Shooting Championship and the 53rd National Shooting (Shotgun) Championship.The selection trials and coaching camp for The Indian Shotgun Shooting team were held here in December 2009, March 2010 and April 2010.In 2006, the Indian Shotgun Masters was also held there. It was also the venue for the selection of the Mexico World Cup and China World Cup for shooting.advertisementlast_img read more

Xiaomi takes its first steps into Apples turf

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