WATCH: University of Limerick submarine robot investigates historical WW1 ship wrecks

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first_imgWhatsApp THE recently unveiled Irish National Monuments Service Wreck Viewer lists the locations of more than 4,000 shipwrecks from a total of 18,000 records of potential wrecks in Irish waters giving some indication of the available infrastructure on the seafloor.The discovery and high detailed survey of these shipwreck sites was possible for the first time through the technological innovations that the CRIS team have been trialling. The underwater vehicle control system, developed at UL, and funded by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI)  uses artificial intelligence (AI) and high powered computers for autonomous controls, enabling perception and the ability for the robot to evaluate situations independent of human help. These technologies unlock a high level of safety and awareness, which is essential for operating in difficult conditions such as shipwrecks and high weather areas off our coast.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Dr Gerard Dooly, chief scientist for the survey and deep wreck diver, said, “Close quarter inspection of these sites with an ROV is technically challenging and hazardous due to the presence of abandoned fishing gear.“The blended control and automation of the ROV provided by our UL developed OceanRINGS software and other UL systems allows us to safely complete these missions. Near the wreck, we saw pots and pans and unexploded ordinance (shells and primers) scattered on the seafloor reminding us of the human misfortune that occurred at the time of sinking.“Every wreck has its own story, so it’s always interesting to locate long forgotten shipwrecks and then try to determine the identity of the wreck and understand something of the circumstances of the tragedy.”Profiting from benign weather conditions at this time of year, the survey successfully located and dove on two large – greater than 100 metres in length – wrecks thought to be that of a Liner and a large cargo vessel and one smaller wreck which was found to be an operational WWI era U-boat. A high definition camera survey of one of the wrecks revealed that intact parts of the ship were colonised by various colourful epifauna: anemones, solitary corals, oysters and brachiopods.Subsequent multibeam mapping of one wreck, though to be that of the Ocean Liner S.S. Canadian, applying a newly published protocol on high-definition imaging of shipwrecks developed by the Centre for Maritime Archaeology (UUC) showed a large debris field that was not visible on the original map of the wreck, suggesting a violent impact with the seabed. Previous articleLimerick train journeys hit all time highNext articleCapital funding for 60-bed block unit at University Hospital Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSeducationhistoryNewsTechnology TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Twitter NewsEducationHeritageVideoWATCH: University of Limerick submarine robot investigates historical WW1 ship wrecksBy Staff Reporter – February 4, 2019 1421 Linkedin Email Facebookcenter_img Limerick on Covid watch list RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR O’Connells Butchers bringing a new element to customer service Print Advertisement Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Local backlash over Aer Lingus threatlast_img read more

Jose Mourinho returns to Chelsea

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first_imgChelsea has reportedly agreed a deal with Jose Mourinho that will see the outgoing Real Madrid boss re-join the Stamford Bridge side on a four year deal on early next week according to The Sun.The Special One sealed a spectacular £40million four-year deal on Tuesday night.A senior Blues source revealed: “It’s official Jose is a Chelsea man again! Everyone is delighted he’s coming back — the club, the players and the fans“We are already looking forward to next season — we are sure it’s going to be very exciting.”The Sun exclusively told you on May 3 that Real Madrid chief Mourinho was heading back to the Bridge.And we can now reveal Mourinho finally put pen to paper during a two-day trip to London this week. His cover story was attending the Crystal Palace-Watford play-off final at Wembley on Monday and visiting friends in the capital.But the real purpose of the visit was to seal an emotional return to his beloved Blues along with right-hand man Rui Faria.Now it is expected he will be unveiled next week in a blaze of publicity by the Europa League champions.That is after he has taken charge of Real’s final game at home to Osasuna on Saturday, which will bring to an end his controversial three-year reign at the Bernabeu.There is just time for the 50-year-old father of two to squeeze in a holiday with his family before starting work in earnest in July. Mourinho’s first match looks sure to be the pre-season friendly in Thailand against the Singha All Stars XI, the kick-off to a Far East tour that also takes in Malaysia and Indonesia.Then he will take the Blues to America for the International Champions Cup tournament which features two of Mourinho’s former clubs, Real Madrid and Inter Milan, as well as Everton, Juventus, AC Milan, Valencia and LA Galaxy.Much is expected of Mourinho, who won six trophies in just three seasons during his first spell at Chelsea between 2004-07.last_img read more

Elderly remain a prime target for scammers

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first_imgMASON CITY — Iowa has one of the nation’s oldest populations by percentage and it means the state’s graying residents need to be especially cautious with their money, particularly in this digital age.Ron Long, director of elder client initiatives at Wells Fargo Advisors, says the term “elder financial abuse” covers a wide range of crimes. Long says, “It’s all sorts of evil, predatory behavior that can run the gamut from forging checks, misusing a power of attorney, literally using scare tactics or exaggerated claims to get money out of older people.”A recent survey found 81% of older Americans say they’re confident they’d never fall victim to elder financial abuse, yet nearly half said they know of someone who’s already been swindled. For Iowans who are worried about an elder parent getting duped, Long says there are a few avenues to pursue.“Set up a large transaction alert,” Long says. “You and your mom would decide how much it is, but anything over $500 or $750, you would at least get an alert that it’s happened. Most times, it’s perfectly fine, but you would at least know. We also look to have duplicate statements sent to a trusted person.” Long says it’s not taking control of the older person’s finances, it’s just putting a second set of eyes to work, looking for anything questionable. He also suggests setting up auto bill payments for convenience, and to eliminate the worry from callers who claim they’re with a utility, you’re late paying and they threaten to shut off your power or water.Prevention starts with a conversation, Long says, though it could be difficult to begin such a chat. “It’s not an easy one,” Long says. “We often say, start with yourself, ‘Mom, I’ve started to look at some of the things I need to put in place. I would like to start talking to you about some of the things I’m doing,’ and use that as an entre.”Two-thirds of elder financial abuse crimes are committed by someone known to the victim, either a friend, relative or caretaker. About 15% of Iowans are 65 and older. Iowa ranks 4th in the nation for percentage of residents 65 and over, behind West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and number-one Florida.last_img read more