Wellington falls to Basehor-Linwood 65-40 in first round of state tourney

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first_imgBasehor-Linwood20141219—65 Basehor-Linwood: McPherson 7, Gorman 3, Fisher 6, Gilliam 8, Muldoon 15, Fliger 14, Dale 12. Wellington148108—40 Boys state tournament first round Wellington brings enthusiastic fan base.by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Wellington’s first taste of a state boys basketball tournament may have not been to its liking, but it was most certainly palatable.The Crusaders would lose to Basehor-Linwood 65-40 Wednesday afternoon at the Salina Bicentennial Center. The final score was not a surprise because the senior laden state tournament savvy Bobcats were heavy favorites going in.Still, Wellington put up a fight including an impressive first quarter in which the Crusaders led for much of the period. But Basehor-Linwood would eventually use its size and experience to eventually take over the game. Even after a stirring first quarter in which the Crusaders had their fan base on their feet cheering, the Bobcats found a way to take a 20-14 lead into the second quarter.By halftime the score was 34-22. The third quarter saw the Bobcats’ lead grow to 46-32.Then in the fourth quarter, the Bobcats basically coasted away from a rather gassed Wellington team, that was playing just seven deep. At one point in the fourth quarter, Basehor-Linwood had outscored the Crusaders 17-2.Wellington will now enter the off season with a state tournament under its belt. But it will also have to replace its top scorer Trevor Nance and all-around athlete Colin Reichenberger, who was in full form down the stretch.The Crusaders finished 12-11 – a record that on the surface doesn’t look inspiring. But there was no doubt in February and March, Wellington was a top tier Ark Valley – Chisholm Trail League Div. IV team, going 5-4 down the stretch including three teams who were playing state basketball.On Wednesday, because it was a seventh seed, Wellington got to play Basehor-Linwood, who was undefeated and was still smarting from last year’s first round state tournament loss to El Dorado.The Crusaders quickly established momentum when it won the tip, and A.J. Snipes buried a 3-pointer.The Bobcats would score the next 6 points, before Nance hit a bank shot. Reichenberger on the next possession stole the ball and dished it to Snipes for a layup to give the Crusaders a 7-6 lead.Wellington would then hit a couple of free throws, and when Reichenberger provided yet another assist, this time to Nance, Wellington was leading 11-7. The Wellington fan base was going nuts.A.J. Snipes leads Wellington with 14 points.Basehor-Linwood came back and tied the game at 11. But Snipes would drill his second trey to make it 14-11. Eventually at the 1:16 mark of the first quarter, Bobcats would score on a Carson Fliger deuce to make it 15-14. They would never lose the lead again.The northeast Kansas team would finish up the quarter scoring the last nine points, and added a trey to start the second. Wellington would get within five at one point but B-L would eventually turn it back into a double digit lead at the 2:35 mark of the second quarter and led by 12 at the half.Wellington needed to reestablish momentum to start the second half. But there was none of that as Patrick Muldoon, who scored 15 points as the game’s leading scorer, opened the half with an emphatic dunk.It wouldn’t get much better thereafter. BL maintained its 14 lead until the fourth quarter, when the game turned into a blowout. The Bobcats, who liberally substituting throughout the game, enjoy the payoff down the stretch.center_img Wellington: Phelps 10, Nance 12, Snipes 14, King 4. For more statistics of the game, click here. state tournament game stats.compressedFollow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (3) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +2 Vote up Vote down Brandon · 283 weeks ago Very proud of what the boys did………. Been a long time coming that the town can get behind the basketball programs both boys and girls…….Going to be fun to watch what the future brings…….. Break off the rear view mirror and keep driving forward………. BMW Report Reply 0 replies · active 283 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Brandon · 283 weeks ago Very proud of what the boys did………. Been a long time coming that the town can get behind the basketball programs both boys and girls…….Going to be fun to watch what the future brings…….. Break off the rear view mirror and keep driving forward………. Report Reply 0 replies · active 283 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Guest · 283 weeks ago What a great season! Tracy, when was Wellington’s last winning season? Report Reply 0 replies · active 283 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Liquor Control Board Approves Lottery Process for Retail Marijuana Stores

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first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Washington State Liquor Control BoardThe Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) today approved staff’s recommendation for a lottery that will select the apparent successful applicants for marijuana retail licenses. The independent, double-blind process will take place April 21-25, 2014, and will produce an ordered list of applicants that the agency will use to continue its retail licensing process. The agency expects to begin issuing retail licenses no later than the first week of July.Initiative 502 directed the WSLCB to limit the number of marijuana retail stores by county. In its rules, the WSLCB limited the number of stores statewide to 334. The most populated cities within each county are allotted a maximum number of stores with the remainder at large within the county. The rules further state that if the WSLCB receives more applications for a jurisdiction than there are stores allocated the state would use a lottery process for producing a ranked order of applicants. The allocated list of stores and locations are available on the I-502 implementation section of the WSLCB website.The agency contracted with the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center of Washington State University and the accounting firm for Washington’s Lottery, Kraght-Snell of Seattle, to independently produce rank-ordered lists of applicants in each jurisdiction where a lottery is necessary. Being identified as the apparent successful applicant is not a guarantee that the selected applicant will receive a license. There are multiple requirements for licensure such as the applicant must pass a criminal history and financial investigation as well as have a location that is not within 1,000 feet of a school, park or other area specified by Initiative 502 as places where children congregate.The WSLCB began pre-qualifying applicants for the lottery the weekend of Feb. 21-23, 2014. Applicants had 30 days to return the basic documents necessary to be eligible for the lottery including verification of: their personal criminal history, their age being 21 or older, that they are Washington State residents, that their business was formed in Washington State, and that they have a location address with a right to real property. A letter of intent to lease was acceptable to be eligible for the lottery. WSLCB licensing staff is currently reviewing pre-qualifying packets. Initial estimates of returned packets show that despite repeated notices and reminders to applicants, roughly 25 percent did not return the required documents at all. Of the returned packets, anywhere between 20-50 percent are incomplete, thus disqualifying them from the retail lottery.The WSLCB is expected to post the ordered list of applicants for each jurisdiction in the public records section of the agency website on May 2, 2014.last_img read more

RBR’s Keller Honored for SOURCE Work

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first_imgLITTLE SILVER – Red Bank Regional’s (RBR) Suzanne Keller was recently honored by the Community Affairs and Resource Center (CARC) with its Partner in Youth Development Award for her work as the school’s SOURCE coordinator.The SOURCE is RBR’s school-based youth services program that provides students with a range of services from quality mental health counseling to learning support initiatives. CARC, formerly the Hispanic Affairs & Resource Center, is a nonprofit social services organization operating in Asbury Park, Freehold and Red Bank.Keller, a Manalapan resident, joined the SOURCE in 2006 as a clinician after obtaining her master’s in social work following a successful career in marketing. In 2010 she was promoted to the SOURCE coordinator where she utilizes her unique skill set. She is responsible for maintaining the SOURCE’s state grants and overseeing all special programs. She also maintains relationships within the community, including government agencies and area churches where she helps coordinate other programs such as SAT prep and student college visitations. She has expanded RBR’s reach in the community by organizing a community advisory board that includes more than 40 different agencies and community businesses. Her continued community outreach has introduced new programs to the school such as TOP (Teen Outreach Program), a character-building program in affiliation with Central Jersey Family Heath Consortium.A major component of her job has been perennial fundraising for several foundations. Under The SOURCE Foundation, she organizes and runs several signature events. She enables RBR’s Latino students to achieve their dream of college by administering and fundraising for the Latino Scholarship Foundation. She also sits on a community mentor board to help RBR scholarship students succeed in college.Keller’s fundraising and management expertise was invaluable this year as RBR experienced unprecedented tragedies with the unrelated sudden deaths of two senior students and the displacement of 70 RBR families and faculty during Super Storm Sandy. She set up foundations and raised funds to cover the funeral costs for the students’ families and established ongoing scholarships in the students’ memories. She also continues to raise funds and maintains a list of matching community donations and family needs for those still trying to piece their lives together from the horrific storm damage.With all her business responsibilities, Keller continues her close connection to the students. She maintains her own counseling task load, accompanies students on field trips and sometimes even drives them to school to ensure their attendance. She is guided by the sign above her desk stating, “To the world you might be one person, but to one person you might be the world.”last_img read more

Natural Gas Pipeline Proposed for Raritan Bay

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first_imgBy Joseph SapiaThe Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company is proposing a $1 billion expansion of its natural gas distribution system between southeastern Pennsylvania and New York City, including laying a pipeline to parallel an existing one under most of Raritan Bay and into the Atlantic Ocean off Sandy Hook.The Raritan Bay portion would run about 14 miles from the Morgan section of Sayreville to just off the tip of Sandy Hook, where the new line would continue for about 8 miles under the ocean to an existing 3-mile connector to New York City at the Rockaways.“New York City is consuming more (natural) gas,” said Chris Stockton, a spokesman for Williams, the Oklahoma-based parent of Transcontinental (Transco). “They’ve adopted clean air mandates.”This means a conversion to what proponents say is cleaner-for-the-environment natural gas, rather than fuel oils.“Most people don’t realize this infrastructure is underground,” Stockton said.But coastal environmentalists have expressed their opposition, saying renewable energy should be on the plate and raising concerns about the pipeline’s effect on the ecosystem.“Why do we need another pipeline, especially one that’s going through Raritan Bay? We’re not going to see the gas (in New Jersey),” said Jamie Zaccaria, outreach coordinator for the New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club environmental group.“It’s a lot of money, time, effort on something you don’t need,” said Joe Reynolds, co-chair of the Bayshore Regional Watershed Council. “I don’t see any plan or drawings New Jersey’s going to get any of this natural gas.“We should be transitioning to renewable energy, not fossil fuels,” Reynolds said. “Why is New Jersey slave to fossil fuels?”Fran Donnelly, left, and Joe Reynolds, both co-chairs of the Bayshore Regional Watershed Council, attend an information forum on a proposed natural gas pipeline crossing Raritan Bay.The environmentalists attended a gas company information session Wednesday, June 22, in Old Bridge.The Northeast Supply Enhancement Project, as the proposal is known, is “early in the process,” Stockton said. In May, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) OK’d a pre-application, opening up to comments by the agency and public on the proposal.Transco is in the process of conducting various surveys – engineering, environmental and community – for the project. It expects to formally apply to FERC in March.FERC would then conduct a public hearing process. If Transco gets approval, construction is to start sometime in the second half of 2018, with gas being delivered on the line in the winter of 2019-2020.The 26-inch-diameter, steel pipeline, carrying 400 million cubic feet of natural gas per day, would be buried 4 feet under the bay or ocean bed in general areas and 8 feet below the assigned maintenance depth of shipping channels.In the Two River area, the line would generally run about 3 to 5 miles offshore, but less than 1 mile off the tip of Sandy Hook. It would run parallel by 25 feet from an existing line, also carrying about 400 million cubic feet of natural gas per day, in place since the late 1960s.The Sierra Club supports renewable energy, such as offshore windmills.“New Jersey has the potential for an incredible amount of wind power,” Zaccaria said.“How many times do you have to say no to these lines?” Reynolds said.Reached after the meeting, Andrea Leshak, staff attorney for the New York-New Jersey Baykeeper, reiterated the concern about using fossil fuel, rather than renewable energy.“We’re concerned putting in another pipeline would continue our reliance on fossil fuels,” Leshak said. “We think we should be heading toward more renewable (energy).”Leshak also raised concerns about how pipeline construction would disrupt the ecosystem – clam grounds, for example – and recreational fishing and boating. Also, Leshak said, there is a concern for a break or a leak in a pipeline.The public attends an information forum in Old Bridge on a proposed natural gas pipeline across Raritan Bay.“There’s a lot of talk about overbuilding pipelines,” Leshak said.But Stockton said pipelines are running at 100 percent capacity, showing there is a need for growth.Information on the project is available from Transco at 866-455-9103 or 866-254-4106, or [email protected],The public can comment to Kimberly D. Bose, secretary, at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First St. NE, Room 1A, Washington, D.C., 20426, or through the FERC website, www.ferc.gov. Information is available at 202-502-8258 or [email protected] has about 500 miles of natural gas line in New Jersey, or about half of the natural gas lines in the state. In the United States, Williams has about 10,000 miles of natural gas line, through which it sends about 10.9 billion cubic feet of gas per day.last_img read more

Leafs outlast Bruins 4-1 to sweep season series

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first_imgThe Leafs improve to 29-17-0-4 and host the Beaver Valley Nitehawks Friday at the NDCC Arena at 7 p.m.Nelson closes out the regular season Saturday in Fruitvale against the Hawks.The Leafs open the playoffs against Castlegar the following week.Grand Forks finished the regular season without a win at home.The Bruins, 1-48-0-2, travel to Spokane to close out the season against the Braves Sunday. The Nelson Leafs outshot the Grand Fork Border Bruins 53-14 en route to a 4-1 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory Thursday in Boundary Country.The win completes a sweep of the season series for Nelson over the Murdoch Division rivals.last_img read more

“Impressive” – the Memory Capabilities of Honeybees

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first_img“Over the past decade, work on the honey bee has provided growing evidence that insects are not simple, reflexive creatures,” begins a paper in PNAS by international scientists.1  “The brains of honey bees are very small, but their ability to learn and memorize tasks is impressive.”  (Emphasis added in all quotes.)    With clever experiments, they put test bees through their paces.  They found them able to discern between relevant and irrelevant clues when lost, findings that “point to a remarkably robust, and yet plastic, working memory in the honey bee.”  See also the 02/15/2005 entry on honeybee mental mapping capabilities.1Zhang et al., ”Visual working memory in decision making by honey bees,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0501440102, published online before print March 28, 2005.Bee aware: among all their expressions of amazement about the capabilities built into such a tiny insect, the authors made no mention of evolution in their paper.  That may sting the Darwinists but create a real buzz elsewhere, honey.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Month-End Close-Out

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first_imgSometimes the creation-evolution news comes in too fast.  Here’s a baker’s dozen from the October shelf, lest they go stale; time to start a new batch for November.Charity begins at worldview:  David Cyranoski in Nature (450, 24-25, 10/31/2007) investigated why the level of charitable giving in prosperous Japan is a tenth of that in America.  It’s not just due to economic realities, regulatory policies and taxes.  The behavior is consistent from rich to poor, from corporate to private.  The most intractable problem, he wrote, was “a culture in which individuals, rich or not, do not generally donate.”  Cyranoski interviewed a patient advocate and a scientist who are trying to change the culture.  “People think the government is going to do everything for them,” explained a leader of a philanthropic organization in Tokyo.  The author did not delve into possible religious reasons for the disparity between Japanese and American attitudes about charitable giving – Japan is less than 1% Christian, while America is nominally 75% or more – but did refer to societal belief in the collective rather than the individual.  Is this a problem science can fix?Dino adventure:  Alison Abbott in Nature (450, 18-20, 10/31/2007) wrote up an adventure story about attempts to excavate dinosaur bones along the Colville River, Alaska.  The ill-fated expedition was full of troubles, woes, infighting and only partial success, but spoke of this “whole trove of dinosaur fossils – mostly fragmented skulls and bones belonging to hadrosaurs” as quite remarkable, a “home to diverse species of polar dinosaurs.”  Unfossilized bone has reputedly been found in this 200 km bone bed, which displays evidence of a watery catastrophe, says creationist writer Margaret Helder.  Remember the tracks found at the south pole?  (See article on EurekAlert and the 10/18/2007 entry).No room for error:  Biophysicists constructed their own protein loops, reported a team from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and found them to be delicate.  Tiny changes in the amino acid order produced large changes in the loops.  Writing in PNAS, they said, “These results suggest that the high-resolution design of protein loops is possible; however, they also highlight how small changes in protein energetics can dramatically perturb the low free energy structure of a protein.”How the sherpas do it:  Tibetans live at high altitude and carry heavy loads with ease in conditions that would quickly exhaust most flatlanders (see 06/17/2005).  How do they do it?  A mostly-American team found that they have more nitric oxide (NO) in their bloodstream, which increases blood flow.  “This suggests that NO production is increased and that metabolic pathways controlling formation of NO products are regulated differently among Tibetans,” they found.  “These findings shift attention from the traditional focus on pulmonary and hematological systems to vascular factors contributing to adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia,” they concluded.  This seems to suggest that a simple change in a regulatory factor, rather than substantive physiological changes, allowed these people to adapt to their unique environment.Spanish tiger tusks:  Large mammal bones in abundance have been found in a “vast fossil hoard” near Granada, Spain, reported the BBC News.  “Giant hyenas, sabretoothed cats, giraffes and zebras lived side by side in Europe 1.8 million years ago.”  About 4,000 fossils have been found so far.  They say this place, near a crossroads of ecological zones, was a hyena den, where hyenas feasted and left the bones.  Must have been some hyenas to feast on mammoths and sabretooth cats.Lava vs meteor:  Chixculub didn’t do in the dinosaurs, Gerta Keller is still arguing.  Despite the nearly weekly matter-of-fact statements about the meteor that made the dinosaurs go extinct, a press release from the Geological Society of America discussed Keller’s view that supervolcanism in India was responsible.  Not only was the impact event too early, it produced one tenth of the deadly gases that came from India’s Deccan traps, she calculated.Dino tracks in China:  Parallel trackways of “raptor” dinosaurs have been found in China, reported Science Daily, suggesting that this species did hunt, or at least hike, in groups.Reptile tracks in Canada:  [email protected] reported a discovery of reptile tracks from Canada claimed to be 315 million years old – “1 million and 3 million years older than the previous find” (and a kilometer lower in the rock strata).Western science:  Science magazine (11/02/2007, Vol. 318. no. 5851, p. 733) gave a portrait of Xu Guangqi, the Renaissance man of China (b. 1562).  He brought science and geometry to the East.  Where did he get it?  From the West.  He learned it from Jesuit missionary Matteo Ricci, and spread its influence across the land.  Xu Guangqi brought calendar reform, improvements to irrigation, and Euclid’s Elements to China, along with other Western ideas.  “For his achievements, he has been compared to Leonardo da Vinci and Francis Bacon” (provided he reference his sources).Eastern stem cells:  China and Australia are collaborating on stem cell research – with adult stem cells, that is: see ScienceScope Oct. 26 in Science.  The $1 million Australia-China Centre for Excellence in Stem Cells will be “using adult mesenchymal stem cells to treat cancer and diseases of the lung and liver,” then combining the research with immunology to “push the field forward,” the paragraph said.Make like a lemur:  We’re all related to flying lemurs, reported National Geographic based on a phylogenetic study in Science (11/02/2007, Vol. 318. no. 5851, pp. 792-794).  Look before you leap.Ringmoons:  More small embedded moonlets have been found in Saturn’s A ring, reported Science Daily.  They seem confined to a narrow belt.  Scientists think they are relatively recent, not related to the initial origin of the rings.  Even so, explaining the apparently youthful age of the entire ring system remains a challenge.Convergent design:  Elaborate tri-cusped molars evolved separately more than once, if a story in National Geographic is credible.  A new species of Jurassic mammal found fossilized in China had the same molars, “very advanced in terms of its tooth structure,” that unrelated mammals also had.““since Pseudotribos robustus belongs to a different and long-lost lineage, it must have evolved the cut-and-grind tooth independently,” the article said matter-of-factly.  “This is an example of a process known as convergent evolution.”  The National Geographic Society partially funded the research that was published in Nature (11/01/2007, 450, 93-97).Encore:  A letter in last week’s Science by two molecular biologists recommended that we should be “borrowing from biology.”  They were particularly struck by the efficient way plants extract all the energy from sunlight in their photosynthetic reaction centers.  “Perhaps we should study biology more often and more directly for solutions to our pressing ‘modern’ problems.”These are just a few examples of the dozens of articles that pass before our editorial eyes in an attempt to inform our readers of noteworthy discoveries relating to origins.  Your letters keep this service going.  Write here if you have a comment.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Photo library: Tourism and leisure 13

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first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Mthatha, Eastern Cape province: A display at the Nelson Mandela Museum. The museum houses historical texts on and photographs of the former prisoner, president, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s life, as well as a large collection of gifts, degrees and citations made to him. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Qunu, Eastern Cape province: A replica of the Robben Island cell in which Nelson Mandela was imprisoned, at the Nelson Mandela Museum. Mandela grew up in the village of Qunu. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Qunu, Eastern Cape province: A display with a photo of the Robben Island prison, at the Nelson Mandela Museum. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image TOURISM AND LEISURE 13:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected]last_img read more

Play Your Part: make South Africa even better

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first_imgJust launched, the Play Your Part campaign calls on all South Africansto contribute to positive change.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library)MEDIA CONTACT • Tracey Peppler  forgood  +27 11 771 2552 Play Your Part is a newly launched national initiative by Brand South Africa, and powered by the organisation forgood, to encourage all South Africans – from businesses to individuals, NGOs to government, churches to schools, young and not so young – to contribute to positive change, to become involved, to simply play a part.Through our unique South African spirit of ubuntu and our innate creativity, we hope to bring together like-minded individuals, communities and companies so that we may all become active citizens.Play your part in giving someone a helping hand, donating time and resources, providing the know-how to start a business or an opportunity to kick-start a career. We all have our part to play, big or small.With the 35th anniversary of the Soweto uprisings approaching on 16 June, celebrate what South African youth have achieved. In 1976 they were young, today they are heroes. Everyone needs a hero. You are young now, whose hero will you be one day? Play your part and become that hero … because even heroes have to start somewhere.Play your part today and let us drive this initiative forward into the bright, promising future of South Africa our land.What’s forgood all about?It’s a home-grown social network that combines purpose with fun and rewards.The forgood community is made up of friends, groups and activities. Members create groups and activities that other friends on forgood can join.Connect with others near you or those who share your cause. Offer whatever you can: time, money, skills or resources.Get your good on and earn recognition and good points in our Give/Get programme. Once you’ve earned enough points, you can exchange them for real-life rewards. Give vouchers to a group or an NGO – get movie tickets and or other goodies for yourself. We make giving fun for everyone.If you’re already involved in a social outreach project, or even if you just love helping others, create a profile for yourself, then create your group and get others to join your cause. Everyone who shares your cause and lives within 50km of your group will be invited to join you.How about if you really want to do something worthwhile but don’t know where to start looking? Once you sign up, groups and activities will come looking for you based on where you live and what you’re passionate about.Forgood gives you a real-time map of social action in your community, showing you which groups and activities are working for good right now on your local map. In time, you will find recycling points, HIV clinics, schools and other helpful places in your area.You can also read inspiring stories of good news happening on your doorstep. Or share your good news with us.last_img read more

Cape Town celebrates Mandela’s life

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first_img11 December 2013Cape Town is gearing up for its tribute to Nelson Mandela at the Cape Town Stadium on Wednesday evening.The commemorative event – Nelson Mandela: A Life Celebrated – will serve as Cape Town’s memorial service to honour the life of Mandela, the city said in a statement on Tuesday.The city has allocated R72-million for its week-long programme of events honouring Mandela, the former state president who died at his Johannesburg home last Thursday. The city’s events are in line with the national week of mourning.On Tuesday night, a remembrance evening was held at OR Tambo community hall in Khayelitsha. An address by poet Don Mattera, stirring performances by choirs including the Masi Choir from Masiphumelele township, as well as inter-faith prayers by community and religious leaders, were part of the evening’s events.Cape Town also hosted a special joint sitting of the two Houses of Parliament – the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces – on Monday to honour and commemorate Mandela.Some of South Africa’s favourite artists, including Johnny Clegg, Freshlyground and Ladysmith Black Mambazo, have been asked to perform at Wednesday’s tribute event.Former Springbok rugby player Francois Pienaar who captained the team that won the Rugby World Cup in 1995, Cape Town Executive Mayor Patricia de Lille, and Western Cape Premier Helen Zille will share their memories and impressions of Mandela, the city said.Shado Twala will be the MC for the evening. There will also be performances by the Bala Brothers, Allou April, and Carla Diamond as well as various choirs.Transport and safety plans used during the 2010 World Cup have been initiated to ensure things run smoothly. Free public transport will be available for the memorial and funeral services on Wednesday and Sunday.In an effort to maintain order and safety, the city instituted a free coupon system. By Tuesday morning, all 64 000 coupons had been issued, which was “a wonderful display of Madiba’s great impact on everyone’s lives”, the city said.Coupon-holders were asked to give away the coupons that they would not be using as “this is the best way of honouring Madiba: ensuring that as many people as possible can attend the event”.Other events planned by the city include a remembrance evening in Atlantis on Thursday; a night vigial on the Grand Parade on the eve of Mandela’s funeral; and the screening of the national funeral on the Grand Parade on Sunday.Robben Island, the Drakenstein Correctional Centre, Pollsmoor, Cape Town City Hall and the Grand Parade have been identified as key areas where people are likely to congregate to pay their respects. The city has also assured its residents that there will also be “free and convenient” access to venues and related events close to their homes.Public viewing areas where communities may view the remembrance and funeral services are: the Grand Parade, Atlantis, Durbanville, Khayelitsha, Swartklip, Vygieskraal, Muizenberg.Visit the City of Cape Town’s website for more information: www.capetown.gov.zaWatch as Mandela surprises Johnny Clegg during his performance of Asimbonanga, which he performed in Frankfurt in 1999SAinfo reporter and City of Cape Townlast_img read more