Research to Improve Access to Quality Cancer Services

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first_imgImproving patient access to quality colorectal cancer services in Nova Scotia is the focus of a five-year study by Nova Scotia researchers. Funding for this project, and six others across the country to study access to, and quality of, care for different types of cancer, was announced today, Aug. 24, by the federal government, through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). Local funding partners include Cancer Care Nova Scotia, Department of Health, Capital Health, Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation and Dalhousie medical school. A $1.5-million grant, over the next five years, will enable Nova Scotia researchers to study patient access to care and the quality of treatment for colorectal cancer from diagnosis through surgery, treatment, follow-up care, advanced disease and palliative care. Researchers will also analyze access to care for two potentially vulnerable groups: adults with mental illness and children and youth. Using data from the Nova Scotia Cancer Registry and other Nova Scotia databases, researchers will develop methods and tools to measure access to, and quality of, colorectal cancer services at every stage to better understand how to improve the system. Health Minister Chris d’Entremont said the complexities of cancer issues requires teamwork to find solutions. “This project is a fine example of how, by sharing our expertise and resources, we can accomplish something together that we would not have each been able to do on our own,” Mr. d’Entremont said. “The fact that Nova Scotia was one on the two largest studies funded speaks to the high caliber of cancer research in this province.” Dr. Eva Grunfeld, principal investigator for the study, professor, Dalhousie University, and director Cancer Outcomes Research Program, Cancer Care Nova Scotia, said it is an important study for Nova Scotians. “Its findings will provide researchers, doctors, other health professionals and decision and policy makers with better information to guide decisions which support improved access to quality cancer services throughout the province,” Dr. Grunfeld said. “For Canada’s government, ensuring Canadians get the cancer care they need, when they need it, is central to a stronger, safer, better Canada,” said Parliamentary Secretary for Health Steven Fletcher. “This initiative provides additional support to the government’s commitment to work with the provinces and territories to develop patient wait-times guarantees.” Dr. Alan Bernstein, president of the CIHR, said the study could play a key role in improving care. “Capacity building, improved dialogue and information sharing within all areas of the health-care system are crucial for reasonable and timely access to health care in all areas and communities across Canada,” said Dr. Bernstein. The selected CIHR teams had a rigorous peer-review process before being approved and exemplify CIHR’s comprehensive, problem-based approach to funding excellence in health research. Funds will be distributed over the next five years to the seven teams. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research is the government of Canada’s agency for health research. CIHR’s mission is to create new scientific knowledge and to catalyze its translation into improved health, more effective health services and products, and a strengthened Canadian health-care system. Composed of 13 institutes, CIHR provides leadership and support to more than 11,000 health researchers and trainees across Canada. Cancer Care Nova Scotia is a program of the Department of Health, created to reduce the burden of cancer on individuals, families and the health-care system through prevention, screening, education and research. FOR BRAODCAST USE: Improving patient access to quality colorectal cancer services in Nova Scotia is the focus of a five-year study by Nova Scotia researchers. Funding for this project, and six others across the country to study access to, and quality of care for, different types of cancer was announced today (August 24th) by the federal government, through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Local funding partners include Cancer Care Nova Scotia, Department of Health, Capital Health, Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation and Dalhousie medical school. A $1.5-million grant, over the next five years, will enable Nova Scotia researchers to study patient access to, and quality of, treatment and care. This includes diagnosis, surgery, treatment, follow-up care, advanced disease and palliative care. Researchers will also analyze access to care in two potentially vulnerable groups: adults with mental illness and children and youth. -30-last_img

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