Porsche Taycan Spied Looking Sleek In Copenhagen

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 28, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Porsche Releases Latest Taycan Design Sketches Ahead Of Reveal 2020 Porsche Taycan Teased Wearing Silly Stripes More Taycan news Source: Electric Vehicle Newscenter_img Porsche does a very good job of hiding the camouflage on the body.Some new spy shots from Danish site Pro-Street catch the Porsche Taycan testing on the roads around Copenhagen. While the electric sedan doesn’t appear to be camouflaged at first glance, Porsche still keeps some sections of this test mule under wraps. Porsche Taycan Electric Car Racks Up Over 20,000 Orders Porsche likes to use black test mules and then cover them with matching pieces of concealment. Unlike the swirling camouflage that other automakers use, this method makes the job of spotting what’s hidden much difficult. On this Taycan, the engineers also employ fake coverings over the headlights, but with the lamps on, these images reveal their true shape. At the back, the fake exhaust pipes might fool most drivers into thinking this is a combustion-powered Porsche.The production Taycan will make its big debut in September, and customers in some markets will be able to buy the electric sedan before the end of the year. According to Porsche’s preliminary specs, the Taycan will have an electric motor powering each axle, and they’ll offer over 600 horsepower (447 kilowatts). The battery pack should offer over 310 miles (500 kilometers) of driving range.Porsche also touts having over 20,000 pre-orders for the Taycan, which is a figure equal to the automaker’s production capacity for the sedan in a year. To cope, the company is already boosting assembly plans.In 2020, the Taycan lineup will grow with the introduction of the Sport Turismo wagon. It’ll be mechanically identical to the sedan but will offer the advantage of carrying more cargo. In 2021, an electric Macan will join the range, and the crossover will ride on a different platform than the combustion-powered model.Source: Pro-Street.dklast_img read more

Vocal Flutey can help inexperienced England call the tune

first_img Share on Twitter Share Share on Twitter Facebook Twitter Share Report Share on Facebook Report Share via Email Sign up to the Breakdown for the latest rugby union news Share Share on Facebook Principe, I get where you’re coming from, but there are two things that bother me about not selecting someone who wasn’t born in your country:1) Mike Catt, and2) Mike Catt.While I appreciate that he would never have made the Springboks if he had stayed in South Africa, the man is as patriotic an Englishman as any in the World Cup squad of 2003 and fully deserved his place.Where’s the difference?English patriotism is a sublime subject. If you’re not English born, you probably have a set of feelings about the country depending on where in the world you hail from; if you’re English born but with a different ethnic background, you probably maintain two nationalities in conflict with each other; if you’re English born and English bred, you’re probably too cynical to be labelled patriotic, and if you display patriotism, you’re accused of being some Empire-fetishist blimp who is borderline racist, or at least stereotypically arrogant.England these days is a mini-America with a non-Hallmark dream. It’s a diverse culture, and that’s a good thing. It’s robust enough to handle first generation Jamaican immigrants playing cricket for its national team, or Nigerians competing as athletes under the GB badge, or even adopted Kiwis in its rugby team. Report Read more Reply Share on Facebook Topics Twitter Report England rugby union team Sportblog 2 0 1 31 Oct 2008 15:45 5 Report blogposts Share via Email 50 Share on Pinterest 31 Oct 2008 17:23 Share on Messenger Reply Facebook 0 1 | Pick jonnyboy71 | Pick Show 25 Share on Facebook | Pick 0 1 All Report Reply Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Reply 31 Oct 2008 17:26 | Pick 0 1 I have absolutely no doubt that Riki can make the step up. He’s the perfect professional in his preparation, a leader who is thoughtful in analysis of the opposition – often found poring over his laptop and coming up with ideas about where and how to attack – and vocal on the field when tactics have to be changed.A year ago he and Danny Cipriani were making magic, and their empathy has returned as Danny gets back to full match fitness. Put Danny Care, the form scrum-half, inside them and you get a trio of all-court decision-makers who kick and distribute but who are all prepared to run the ball and thus command the constant attention of opposition back rows and midfields.When you have three guys who can hurt in centre field it often creates the space wide out for the runners and, although Johnson may not have intended a back three of Paul Sackey, Delon Armitage and Ugo Monye, injuries have dictated that England will be playing a pretty rapid trio, at least against the Pacific Islands.The sick list also looks likely to provide a further club link between scrum-half and No8, where Nick Easter has been drafted in as cover for Luke Narraway, the Gloucester back-row struggling with a hamstring problem.Narraway was one of the few to return from New Zealand in the summer with his reputation enhanced, but there has been a temptation to undervalue his understudy. Easter had a good World Cup, where his strength in contact was both a cornerstone for the pack and a target for the backs – much as his Harlequins coach, Dean Richards, used to be. However, the muscle tends to distract from Easter’s more skilful side. This season he appears to have slimmed down, making him a bit quicker, but he’s still a deft distributor, making those sympathetic little offloads that keep an attack moving and defences on the back foot.So a line can be drawn through 8, 9, 10 and 12, but there are likely partnerships to be exploited elsewhere. James Haskell, back at blind-side flanker, has a near telepathic understanding with the open-side Tom Rees, and Bath’s mobile hooker Lee Mears should figure, at least for the first game, after years throwing in to Steve Borthwick. He might not be in place when scrummaging becomes more of an issue – something I’d like to return to – but it’s another platform and one on which Johnson can build. Facebook Loading comments… Trouble loading? 0 1 Report Share on Facebook Share on WhatsApp Share Share on Facebook @carnie: If permanent residency isn’t a fair criterion and you feel that someone’s ‘Englishness’ should be judged otherwise, write to the IRB. But be prepared to address questions of race, birthright and other questions only resolvable by recourse to DNA analysis. It’s important that England play by the rules, which also involves playing to the rules. But let the rules be the same for everyone. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook | Pick I’ve got no problem personally with players qualifying through residency, as long as they’ve never played under a different flag at senior level. It’s perfectly possible for someone to feel as patriotic about an adopted country as a native – and how do you measure that, anyway?More to the point, it doesn’t stop countries like Oz signing up players like Willie O and Clyde Rathbone.Moon, that offering doesn’t scan. Are you getting into prose or something?Good piece from a newly-humble Shaun. If Care, Cipriani and Flutey can gel, it’s definitely a proactive and tactically astute 9-10-12 axis. Stacking up against the southern hemisphere, I think Care is as good as Jimmy Cowan and Luke Burgess but du Preez remains a class apart; Cipriani is virtually untested but Giteau and Carter are simply class, Ruan Pienaar needs an extended spell at 10 – he’s an Austin Healey right now. At inside centre, if Flutey gets back to last season’s form and translates that to international level, you have a very effective second five-eight with the range of skills, not a pure bosher or stepper. No one else comes close at 12 for England currently, Geraghty is just too lightweight to survive in ELVland and down under.England are just a spare parts team currently. Shaun’s right to ask for patience – but it’s international rugby, and the public’s resolve changes every 40 minutes, never mind every game. Witness Cipriani’s debuts in the 5N last year: everyone is so keen to deify or damn, it’s ridiculous.3 years to build from scratch something to get to the semis and then take it further. This is going to be interesting… carnie Twitter Facebook Report Report Shaun Edwards 0 1 Reuse this content,View all comments > “It’s perfectly possible for someone to feel as patriotic about an adopted country as a native”…. couldn’t agree more, jonnyboy, but that’s the question, has he actually adopted the country, or just the jersey? The lowest possible test of patriotism, you’d think, would be taking citizenship – it doesn’t matter at all how deep his Kiwi roots go if he’d rather be a Brit’. But I can find no mention of him even planning to take a UK passport, even if he’s not eligible yet.He told the Times in July that “I didn’t make it as an All Black but I want to see how I’d perform at international level.” Like I say, nothing personal, that’s a noble ambition, but surely you can see that this is bad for rugby? Principe | Pick Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook Reply 0 1 0 1 31 Oct 2008 14:29 Share on Twitter 5 | Pick Reply 0 1 Twitter Report 0 1 Share on Twitter Sherb Metatone Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter Sherb Share on Facebook 31 Oct 2008 17:18 0 1 Twitter A message to the Twickenham boo boys: patience please. Martin Johnson is setting off on a journey that ends in New Zealand in 2011. It’s not a sprint. Building a winning side takes time. Ask Sir Clive Woodward – his 2003 World Cup winners weren’t exactly overnight successes. So cut the new man a little slack this autumn.Instead of exercising the larynx in the manner of an irritable Wembley crowd, seemingly a thing of the past, bring the grey cells into play. Eschew short-termism, try looking to the future, even if it’s sometimes difficult to see beyond the immediate demands.On successive Saturdays, starting next week, Johnson’s men play the Pacific Islands, Australia, South Africa and finally New Zealand – matches that will dictate England’s place in the world standings and consequently their World Cup seeding. Two wins is probably par for the course, three would be good. So far not a lot has gone Johnson’s way bar the order of play.Given the opposing quartet, getting the Pacific Islands first up is about the best that could hoped for when victories are an immediate concern but bedding in a new team is the overriding priority. However, in spite of the injuries which always seem to dog England and the need to rotate players – no one should play four consecutive Test Saturdays – I’m pretty hopeful that the next month will provide an outline, possibly even the skeleton, of a side capable of long-term success.We’ll know the England starting line-up next Tuesday, but I already expect it to be littered with partnerships on which Johnson will build – the most obvious of them being the midfield and its link to the forwards. When Johnson sent Olly Barkley and Dan Hipkiss back to their clubs this week, it signalled that England were preparing to give Riki Flutey his international debut outside Danny Cipriani, a logical inside-centre/fly-half pairing considering their club partnership and the way England’s attack coach, Brian Smith, says he intends to play. 31 Oct 2008 16:38 Reply jonnyboy71 31 Oct 2008 18:25 Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter Report Facebook Burly 0 1 Twitter Sherb Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Reply unthreaded Report Principe, taking on citizenship is no measure of nationality, as you can be a British citizen and still hold citizenship in another country. There are no such stipulations as having a parent born here. You do your time, you pass your tests, and you get the badge, as it were.The residency period might be deemed too short, but them’s the rules.If Barkley and Flood are a bit peeved, maybe they should work harder to become better players? If the fallout from this means standards are driven up, that’s great.If Flutely plays, then good luck to him. Share 31 Oct 2008 17:21 4 Share Close report comment form Share on Twitter Share Report Burly CloudyBay Share on Twitter Facebook Share 31 Oct 2008 18:00 jonnyboy71 Comments 113 Share on Twitter 31 Oct 2008 18:37 Share Share on Facebook 31 Oct 2008 18:29 Share on Twitter | Pick recommendations Share on Facebook Share Share 3 … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. | Pick 31 Oct 2008 17:34 Reply Facebook Principe More importantly, who’s going to play 13? I think Hipkiss should be in there, little cannonball bugger, picks some great outside lines and knows when to straighten it up. Tindall’s having a stinker this year and Noon has been tried, tested, did fine but nothing exceptional. Great defensive performances eg. against France last year excepted. Order by oldest 31 Oct 2008 18:17 thecruiseboy oooh , I’m so excitedyes, two wins would be acceptable but even that ain’t gonna be easy.. I expect the pacific islands side to be full of fire and running rugby and pinching a win against one of the big three is no mean feat even at twickersI am excited by the possible combinations too.. I am not sure who we go with a at outside centre if it’s cips and flutey.. tindall or noon? for some beef – I’d prefer to have another flyer who flutey and cips can put into space – Tait? now that would be sexy midfield (in the rugby sense that is!)briiiiiiing it!!! Report Twitter Principe Twitter Facebook Facebook Report Twitter | Pick Hodgson wasn’t dropped for one missed tackle, but for years of not being able to cut it. He’s had more chances to claim the shirt than anyone, but has never been able to do so.For what it’s worth, I’d rather see Geraghty at 12, surely if he had more games under his belt he’d be first choice for the game plan Brian Smith will presumably want to employ.I’d agree with Hipkiss at 13 too, but failing that, why not Lewsey? Wasps have been playing him there, and we know his defence is equal, if not better than, any of the standard bosh merchants.Does anyone know, other than being injury prone, blonde, and a bit flash, why Strettle isn’t in contention? I know two of those are good enough reasons in their own right, but he’s a seriously good winger. Is Monye really any better? Riki Flutey never really did it for the Hurricanes. Rarely did he start, he usually ran on with 20 mins remaining. Though he made the NZ age grade teams and played for NZ Maori. And that my friends is the key. Erwin Rommel wrote that the Maori were fearsome opponents.It is doubtful whether Flutey would have made the All Blacks. So why not play for England. I will enjoy watching the battle between Flutey and his old mate Ma Nonu. Oh yes, I will put my money on the Maori boy, not the Samoan. 0 1 Facebook Reply Share on Facebook I think a basic requirement should be that they hold a British passport. Either they qualify for one through family or they get one through residence – which, I think, would involve relinquishing any prior citizenship (I THINK you can only get dual nationality through parentage). It seems a pretty obvious bar to set – but someone might pop up and tell me Flutey has a UK passport.It’s definitely too easy right now to qualify through residence – essentially rewarding countries whose clubs pay the highest wages with a stream of international players, and, surely, sending out the wrong message to junior clubs and young players in England. I know Flutey’s just a bloke trying to earn a living and play the best level of rugby he possibly can, but Rugby Union’s great strength it the continuity between the elite sport and the grassroots – the creation of a super-national elite pool of players weakens that bond, and I think that road leads, eventually, to empty seats. Report Riki Flutey trains with the England squad at Pennyhill Park ahead of their clash with the Pacific Islands. Photograph: David Rogers/Getty Images 31 Oct 2008 17:34 nasjaqcenter_img Twitter Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Burley just a quick comment on Flood. He has been playing 10 not 12 at Tigers, which is why he moved. He wants to play 10 not 12 so i don’t see the point picking him at 12. Plus he has been found wanting defensively missing a number of tackles which were it not for those around him would have cost leicester dear. Bearing in mind Hodgsons casting into the wilderness based on 1 missed tackle. Albeit a shocker this smacks of a double standards and B not knowing what you are about or where you want to go.(Maybe why Newcastle conceeded so many) Plus, in my humble opinion he isn’t as good as Barclay or Gheratey or even Hipkiss. (plus if we weren’t picking Flutey id actually rather see someone like Turner Hall from Harlequins given a go.) Share on Twitter StewartM Reply | Pick Share carnie… I’m not sure I agree with you about the funeral… I don’t think you can demand that in principle someone move their parents when they move countries.Overall, I do believe in residency based qualification. It’s a mobile world and if someone wants to make a life a new country, they should have some sort of chance of representing that country.Having said that…. 3 years does seem too short for residency qualification. In principle a young player could play one World Cup with one country and the next with another? Or is it different if they’ve played at top level? I forget. Share Share on Twitter Reply HenryLloydMoon Twitter Share on Twitter Report 0 1 | Pick Email (optional) Facebook Reply Facebook Share 31 Oct 2008 16:45 | Pick Share on Twitter Reply Support The Guardian Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other | Pick Report The partnership of Riki Flutey and Danny Cipriani could be explosive for England, but fans must exercise patience Share on Facebook Flutey himself has said itAnd it’s greatly to his creditThat he is an English man. 25 0 1 newest First published on Thu 30 Oct 2008 20.02 EDT | Pick Share Rugby union Reply Facebook Share | Pick Share on Twitter Share Share Share on Facebook Report Thu 30 Oct 2008 20.02 EDT 0 1 Flippant response is “if he’s good enough, he’s English enough.”Three years is short, but they are the rules. I’d feel pretty peeved were I an Olly Barkley or Toby Flood, but how do you exclude someone who wants to play international rugby and is qualified?He lives in UK, contributes well to the English Premiership, pays UK taxes. I don’t think players can switch countries once they’ve played at senior level, which would be wrong, but if they make the choice who are we to question there motives, financial or ortherwise. Wasps Facebook England rugby union team does anyone else feel as uneasy as me about someone (Flutey) who has simply resided and worked here for 3 years then being able to play for England. I think it takes the proverbial mickey when we all know that when he finishes playing he will more than likely return “home” to NZ, thus proving the point. A similar case was with Vainakola last year needing to return “home” for a funeral. Surely if home is NZ then that’s who they should be trying to represent. I think the 3 year residency rule needs to be reassessed. We don’t want to loook like the rugby league world cup Reply Twitter Reply Share on Twitter 0 1 HenryLloydMoon 31 Oct 2008 18:23 Facebook nasjaq Autumn internationals Share expanded Twitter toniburtoni Share | Pick | Pick 31 Oct 2008 17:48 Threads collapsed Since you’re here… Sportblog Facebook 31 Oct 2008 18:27 England have struggled for a decent and settled centre partnership so if the IRB rules allow Flutey to pledge his alliegance to England then I see no reason not to pick him. Other countries use the rules to their advantage so why not England?As for the tests themselves I think 2 wins should be OK though assuming we can gel and beat the islanders I’m not sure which of the others we will beat. The backs look very exciting and certainly pacey; I haven’t seen much of Monye recently except the highlights on TV so not sure how his defence is (they tend only to show his tries which definitley looks good). All in all looking forward to it. 0 1 Share on Facebook Facebook | Pick Share on LinkedIn Facebook Report 0 1 Fair enough, those are you standards Principe. I just don’t have enough time or interest to get into 1/2s, 1/4s, 1/8s etc. when it comes to nationality. Take your point about the passport though, you’ve sold me. Flutey! Get yourself a damn passport! Reply Share Facebook Reply Flutey played for the Canes when? And in what position?He only made his breakthrough when he moved from London Irish to Wasps. Hardly the first player to require a certain team to reach the top of his ability.Still, I don’t like the selection for 2 reasons:1) He’s not even remotely English2) His form was half a season last year, and this season he’s been as bad as the rest of the Wasps team. Share 1to15, you’re right, he’s not English born and bred. But by the grace of God, he’s managed to get it right eventually.Re: how good he is… to give it the reverse Digger (vis a vis Luke McAlister): he got better since he came to England. I know this is virtually sacrilegeous in Kiwi terms, but if you consider the difference between playing for the Canes (perenial underachievers with a 7s team for a back line) in the S14/ Air NZ and then for Wasps in the Heineken and GP, then he’s proved himself as a consistent and influential player in an intense, high level environment – abroad – where there are no central contracts and poor results mean financial meltdown. People can change, they can improve, and the Canes aren’t a benchmark of excellence.And Martin Johnson played for NZ universities or U21 – and he maintains that he was made an offer to stay in NZ rugby. Everyone does it. Report Twitter 31 Oct 2008 18:28 | Pick I’m afraid for England that the more pressing point is this one: he’s not very good. Couldn’t make the Wellington first team, and was at best an average SH player. That he’s your best pick is, frankly, embarrassing, leaving aside the fact that he ain’t English – for chrissakes, he played NZ Schoolboys and Under 21s, and was born in NZ to NZ parents. I don’t know how you appropriately define being ‘English’ for these purposes to cover all cases, but I think we can all agree that this guy isn’t. Flood would be right to feel upset – he’s bedded in nicely for Tigers and his form eclipses Flutey’s by some way this season. He’s also got some international experience.Barkley, however, has been rubbish. Twitter oldest 31 Oct 2008 17:43 Facebook Share on Facebook Report Share on Facebook CarnieI’ve always felt the same about the three year residency rule, bottom line is he’s no more English than Jonah Lomu so why would you want to pick him. Reason (optional) | Pick Report 0 1 Mike Catt’s mum was from Kent, he was eligible for a UK passport from Day One. And Big Lesley V. has, apparently, started his application for a UK passport, which I think is greatly to his credit, even if he won’t wear white again. If Flutey came out and said, yup, I’m taking a passport as soon as I’m eligible, then he’s welcome on my team bus. For me, it really is all about the little plum-coloured book. You switch teams, you switch countries. Reply Reply DaiDawes Facebook Share on Twitter Reply Facebook 31 Oct 2008 18:32 Share on Twitter Comments to 1 to 15You say he’s not very good and yet he’s been the stand out centre in the guiness premiership and Heineken cup for the last 2-3 years. (Which is a long way ahead of the Super 14 in terms of quality) You say he wasn’t good enough to play for his country, well looking at other sports apparently so was Kevin Peterson and we all know where he is now rated in terms of his status in world cricket….No.1. So i don’t buy the he wasn’t good enough. He may not have been then, but he is now. People mature at different levels and abrring Luke McAllister he is the best 12 in the world.As put by another knowledgable commentator Johnson himself played for NZ under 21’s and was asked about staying on to become an All Black. More to the point, what about all the tongolese, samoans, and fijians player who wear the All Black or Wallabee jersey’s? I don’t see New Zealanders or Wallabies coming out and saying they weren’t born here they can’t play for us. Ultimately if they want to represent a country that has asked them to play, and they are eligible, then fair play to them. You can’t have your cake and eat it. If flutey wants to play for England that should be the beginning and the end of any discussion on the issue. Facebook jonnyboy71 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 31 Oct 2008 18:45 jonnyboy71 0 1 Twitter Share on Facebook 100 Twitter Reply 0 1 View more comments Share one2fifteen Twitter Share on Twitter Report Facebook 31 Oct 2008 18:40 Reply The Thriteen debate is a good one.Noon is either injured or at the least hasn’t played recently through injury and i believe the same is true for Tindall. WAtching teh Rugby club on sky last night there seeded to be 2 options. Either Tait or Delon Armitage with whichever one not at 13 at 15. Personally in that dilema id rather go Tait at 13 Armitage at 15, but i think thats much of a muchness but id be interested in what other people are thinking. 4 Report Vocal Flutey can help inexperienced England call the tune Share on Twitter Twitter 31 Oct 2008 16:52 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Reply Report Share Share on Facebook collapsed | Pick 3 Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter 31 Oct 2008 17:04 comments (113)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. 1 | Pick Shares00 | Pick 0 1 Twitter Share on Facebook 2 | Pick Share on Facebook 1 0 1 Sharelast_img read more

Gardere Relocates in Houston

first_imgNot a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Lost your password? Password Remember mecenter_img Username Gardere will now operate on floors 20 to 22 of Wells Fargo Plaza, where the firm has been a tenant for the past 16 years . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img

Top stories Exploding stars dominating dogs and the Ebola outbreak

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Experimental drug stops Ebola-like infectionAn experimental treatment against an Ebola-related virus can protect monkeys even when given up to 3 days after infection, the point at which they show the first signs of disease. The new results raise hopes that the treatment might be useful for human patients even if they don’t receive it until well after they’re infected.See all of Science’s coverage of the Ebola outbreak, including what Ebola actually does, the ethics of using experimental treatments, and the debate over “repurposed” drugs. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Wolves cooperate but dogs submit, study suggestsA new study comparing dogs and wolves has a surprising conclusion: Wolves are the more tolerant and cooperative species. Dogs, in contrast, form strict dominance hierarchies and demand obedience from lower ranking pack members. As wolves became dogs, the study suggests, they weren’t selected for a cooperative nature—they were bred to follow orders.Poaching drives overall elephant decline in AfricaA spike in poaching has tipped the African elephant into decline, a new study finds. As many as 40,000 elephants were killed in 2011, a 3% loss to the total number of elephants on the continent.China pulls plug on genetically modified rice and cornChina has decided not to renew biosafety certificates that allowed research groups to grow genetically modified (GM) rice and corn. The reasoning behind the move is not clear, and it has raised questions about the future of GM research in the country.Animal speech shows similarities to human languageAnimal sounds have long been considered fundamentally different from human language—indeed, so different that scientists haven’t been able to find any intermediate evolutionary steps between animal calls and language. Now, a new study reveals that the calls of animals contain more languagelike characteristics than previously believed—and that the gap between human language and animal calls is not so wide after all.The star that exploded at the dawn of timeAstronomers have discovered an ancient star just a thousand light-years away from Earth that may be preserving cosmic shrapnel from the death of one of the very first stars born after the big bang. If confirmed, the finding means that some of the universe’s first stars were so massive they died in exceptionally violent explosions that altered the growth of early galaxies.last_img read more

Report sets new goals for US Antarctic Program

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe U.S. research in Antarctica needs fresh initiatives and better equipment, a new report by a committee of the National Academies concludes. But how to afford them remains a conundrum.The report—commissioned by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which funds the United States Antarctic Program (USAP)—is the third major assessment of the program in 5 years, aiming to streamline the program in an era of relatively flat budgets and rising infrastructure costs. It builds on a 2011 report by the National Research Council, which identified important areas of future research for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. This time, NSF asked the committee to lay out a strategic vision for research on the continent over the next decade, identifying specific research priorities while taking into account the program’s logistical needs. NSF and its Division of Polar Programs invest about $70 million a year in science and about $255 million in infrastructure and logistics. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country “Earlier reports were blue-sky,” supporting curiosity-driven research on the continent without setting priorities, says Robin Bell, a co-chair of the report and a glaciologist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. The new report, which takes into account input from more than 450 scientists in the Antarctic research community, does call for continuing a “core program” of such investigator-driven research. But it also advocates for the creation of three priority research initiatives.The Changing Ice Initiative would fund research addressing both what’s driving Antarctica’s ice mass loss and its future course, as well as how it could contribute to global sea-level rise. The Antarctic Genomics Initiative would take stock of the uniquely isolated and adapted life in the region. “It’s a perfect lab for looking at organisms in extreme conditions, and for how they’ll change in a changing environment,” Bell says. The third priority area would create a new, next-generation Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Program to probe deeper into the origins of the universe. A follow-on to the research already conducted at the BICEP telescope at the South Pole, the proposed program would include a family of telescopes at the South Pole and Chile.In choosing these priorities, Bell says, the committee looked for topics with  compelling science, high potential for societal impact, and high “partnership potential” both within NSF, between NSF and other agencies, and with international partners. Projects that would require too many resources were rejected. In particular, the report notes that a proposal to build a second-generation IceCube neutrino observatory fell to concerns that it would overwhelmingly siphon off logistical support from other projects.Indeed, the priorities closely overlap with six overarching research priorities outlined last year in Nature by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR), a group of scientists and policymakers from 22 countries. “Overall there’s a great confluence of thinking, within the U.S. and internationally, about Antarctica and Southern Ocean science priorities,” says Chuck Kennicutt, an oceanographer at Texas A&M University in College Station, who is also a former president of SCAR.But Kennicutt notes that it’s not clear how these projects would be funded within NSF’s constrained Antarctic budget. And parceling out funds between the new theme-driven proposals and principal investigator-driven projects will be only one part of NSF’s looming Antarctic challenge. Conducting research in Antarctica is already expensive—and infrastructure upgrades are sorely needed. In 2012, a blue-ribbon panel convened by NSF identified multiple areas of Antarctic infrastructure requiring improvement.The new report adds to this sense of urgency, calling for better weather forecasting, improved overland and air access to remote field sites in the deep interior of the continent, and greater information technology capabilities. Data transmission capacity from the South Pole station is already inadequate, and the proposed next-generation CMB  program will increase the station’s bandwidth needs further. And then there’s ship support: Now, the United States has only one heavy icebreaker, the 40-year-old Polar Star, capable of clearing thick ice from McMurdo Sound to deliver supplies to the station there. The U.S. program has had to rely on foreign icebreakers for this in some past seasons.But the priority setting should help researchers make the case for more investment. Last year’s SCAR report and the new Academies report, Kennicutt says, are forcing researchers to “decide what’s important” and to justify their work to a broader audience. “These reports lay out why this is compelling science, why we want to spend the money it costs to be in Antarctica,” he adds. “They show that the community is organized.”center_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Was Betty the crow a genius—or a robot

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Fourteen years ago, a bird named Betty stunned scientists with her humanlike ability to invent and use tools. Captured from the wild and shown a tiny basket of meat trapped in a plastic tube, the New Caledonian crow bent a straight piece of wire into a hook and retrieved the food. Researchers hailed the observation as evidence that these crows could invent new tools on the fly—a sign of complex, abstract thought that became regarded as one of the best demonstrations of this ability in an animal other than a human. But a new study casts doubt on at least some of Betty’s supposed intuition.Scientists have long agreed that New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides), which are found only on the South Pacific island of the same name, are accomplished toolmakers. At the time of Betty’s feat, researchers knew that in the wild these crows could shape either stiff or flexible twigs into tools with a tiny, barblike hook at one end, which they used to lever grubs from rotting logs. They also make rakelike tools from the leaves of the screw pine (Pandanus) tree.But Betty appeared to take things to the next level. Not only did she fashion a hook from a material she’d never previously encountered—a behavior not observed in the wild—she seemed to know she needed this specific shape to solve her particular puzzle. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country To figure out how much of an advance Betty had really made, Christian Rutz, a behavioral ecologist at the University of St. Andrews in the United Kingdom, and colleagues spent 4 years studying 18 wild-caught crows they kept temporarily in aviaries on New Caledonia. Under controlled conditions, the scientists videoed the animals as they made 85 of their twig tools. Most of the crows followed the same method. Using their beaks, they broke off small branches from a shrub, one end of which they then fashioned into tiny hooks by snipping and biting the joint where the twig had attached to the shrub. And then, unexpectedly, 10 of the birds did one more thing: They bent the shaft of their tool into a curve by sticking it in a hole or trapping it with a foot, while pulling the other end into an arc, the researchers report today in Royal Society Open Science.“It was exactly what Betty had done [to shape her tool], and a complete surprise,” says Rutz, who had been a postdoc in the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom lab that studied Betty, although he was not involved in research on the bird. “We now think that they bend their tools to get them ready to use; bending is thus part of their natural repertoire.” A follow-up experiment tested eight crows to see whether they preferred to use a straight or slightly curved tool to search holes for food. All the birds chose the curved tools, and used the arced end as the probe. The scientists are now investigating why the birds prefer this shape.So what does all of this mean for Betty?Now that scientists know wild crows bend twigs, it may be that Betty didn’t use insight after all, says Corina Logan, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom who was not involved with the study. (The original study didn’t claim that she did, although others asserted this.) In fact, “she might have been a little robot,” Rutz says, “just following a natural, behavioral routine.”Yet Frans de Waal, a primatologist at Emory University in Atlanta, says we shouldn’t write off Betty. Not all the wild crows in the new study bent their tools, he notes, which suggests that it is likely not a hardwired behavior.Further, “there still remains the significant finding that Betty solved a novel problem using an innovative solution with a novel material,” says Nathan Emery, a cognitive biologist at Queen Mary University of London. And it leaves open the question, “Did the bird have a hook in mind when it was creating it?”In the end, Betty may be even more like us than scientists originally thought, says Alex Kacelnik, a behavioral ecologist at Oxford and a co-author of the original study. She was simply doing what comes naturally to New Caledonian crows, he says: using her “genetic predisposition, experience, and creative cognition” to solve a problem. Just as humans do.last_img read more

Meet the frail smallbrained people who first trekked out of Africa

first_img Mirian Kiladze, © The Georgian National Museum To the ends of earth By following a trail of stone tools and fossils, researchers have traced possible routes for the spread of early Homo out of Africa to the far corners of Asia, starting about 2 million years ago. Simple stone flakes, like those removed from this core, enabled the Dmanisi hominins to butcher meat. Until the discovery of the first jawbone at Dmanisi 25 years ago, researchers thought that the first hominins to leave Africa were classic H. erectus (also known as H. ergaster in Africa). These tall, relatively large-brained ancestors of modern humans arose about 1.9 million years ago and soon afterward invented a sophisticated new tool, the hand ax. They were thought to be the first people to migrate out of Africa, making it all the way to Java, at the far end of Asia, as early as 1.6 million years ago. But as the bones and tools from Dmanisi accumulate, a different picture of the earliest migrants is emerging.By now, the fossils have made it clear that these pioneers were startlingly primitive, with small bodies about 1.5 meters tall, simple tools, and brains one-third to one-half the size of modern humans’. Some paleontologists believe they provide a better glimpse of the early, primitive forms of H. erectus than fragmentary African fossils. “I think for the first time, by virtue of the Dmanisi hominins, we have a solid hypothesis for the origin of H. erectus,” says Rick Potts, a paleoanthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Malkhaz Machavariani, © The Georgian This fall, paleontologists converged in Georgia for “Dmanisi and beyond,” a conference held in Tbilisi and at the site itself from 20–24 September. There researchers celebrated 25 years of discoveries, inspected a half-dozen pits riddled with unexcavated fossils, and debated a geographic puzzle: How did these primitive hominins—or their ancestors—manage to trek at least 6000 kilometers from sub-Saharan Africa to the Caucasus Mountains? “What was it that allowed them to move out of Africa without fire, without very large brains? How did they survive?” asks paleoanthropologist Donald Johanson of Arizona State University in Tempe.They did not have it easy. To look at the teeth and jaws of the hominins at Dmanisi is to see a mouthful of pain, says Ann Margvelashvili, a postdoc in the lab of paleoanthropologist Marcia Ponce de León at the University of Zurich in Switzerland and the Georgian National Museum in Tbilisi. Margvelashvili found that compared with modern hunter-gatherers from Greenland and Australia, a teenager at Dmanisi had dental problems at a much younger age—a sign of generally poor health. The teen had cavities, dental crowding, and hypoplasia, a line indicating that enamel growth was halted at some point in childhood, probably because of malnutrition or disease. Another individual suffered from a serious dental infection that damaged the jawbone and could have been the cause of death. Chipping and wear in several others suggested that they used their teeth as tools and to crack bones for marrow. And all the hominins’ teeth were coated with plaque, the product of bacteria thriving in their mouths because of inflammation of the gums or the pH of their food or water. The dental mayhem put every one of them on “a road to toothlessness,” Ponce de León says. The identity of the people who dropped these stone breadcrumbs is a mystery that has only deepened with study of the Dmanisi fossils. The excavation team has classified all the hominins at the Georgia site as H. erectus, but they are so primitive and variable that researchers debate whether they belong in H. erectus, H. habilis, a separate species, H. georgicus—or a mix of all three, who may have inhabited the site at slightly different dates.A new reanalysis of the Dmanisi skulls presented at the meeting added fuel to this debate by underscoring just how primitive most of the skulls were. Using a statistics-based technique to compare their shape and size with the skulls of many other hominins, Harvard University paleoanthropologist Philip Rightmire found that only one of the Dmanisi skulls—at 730 cubic centimeters—fits “comfortably within the confines of H. erectus.” The others—particularly the smallest at 546 cc—cluster more closely with H. habilis in size.Nor did the Dmanisi hominins walk just like modern humans. A new analysis of cross sections of three toe bones found that the cortical bone—the dense outer layer—wasn’t buttressed in the same way as it is in the toes of modern humans. When these hominins “toed off,” the forces on their toes must have been distributed differently. They may have walked a bit more like chimps, perhaps pushing off the outside edge of their foot more, says Tea Jashashvili of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and the Georgian National Museum.”If there are so many primitive traits, why are they calling it H. erectus?” asks Ian Tattersall, a paleoanthropologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. “People are avoiding the question of what H. erectus is. Every time new stuff comes up, they’re enlarging the taxon to fit new stuff in.” Foley ventures: “I haven’t the slightest idea of what H. erectus means.” Ken Garrett Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) What was it that allowed them to move out of Africa without fire, without very large brains? How did they survive? Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Garvin Grullón Now the site of a medieval church, the promontory at Dmanisi has been a crossroads for humans and animals for at least 1.8 million years. This is the famous site of Dmanisi, Georgia, which offers an unparalleled glimpse into a harsh early chapter in human evolution, when primitive members of our genus Homo struggled to survive in a new land far north of their ancestors’ African home, braving winters without clothes or fire and competing with fierce carnivores for meat. The 4-hectare site has yielded closely packed, beautifully preserved fossils that are the oldest hominins known outside of Africa, including five skulls, about 50 skeletal bones, and an as-yet-unpublished pelvis unearthed 2 years ago. “There’s no other place like it,” says archaeologist Nick Toth of Indiana University in Bloomington. “It’s just this mother lode for one moment in time.”center_img By Ann GibbonsNov. 22, 2016 , 9:00 AM They did, however, have tools to supplement their frail bodies. Crude ones—but lots of them. Researchers have found more than 15,000 stone flakes and cores, as well as more than 900 artifacts, in layers of sediments dating from 1.76 million to 1.85 million years ago. Even though H. erectus in East Africa had invented hand axes, part of the so-called Acheulean toolkit, by 1.76 million years ago, none have been found here at Dmanisi. Instead, the tools belong to the “Oldowan” or “Mode 1” toolkit—the first tools made by hominins, which include simple flakes for scraping and cutting and spherical choppers for pounding. The Oldowan tools at Dmanisi are crafted out of 50 different raw materials, which suggests the toolmakers weren’t particularly selective. “They were not choosing their raw material—they were using everything,” says archaeologist David Zhvania of the Georgian National Museum.That simple toolkit somehow enabled them to go global. “They were able to adjust their behavior to a wide variety of ecological situations,” Potts says. Perhaps the key was the ability to butcher meat with these simple tools—if hominins could eat meat, they could survive in new habitats where they didn’t know which plants were toxic. “Meat eating was a big, significant change,” says paleoanthropologist Robert Foley of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.Even with their puny stone flakes, “these guys were badass,” competing for meat directly with large carnivores, Toth says. At the meeting, he pointed to piles of cobblestones near the entrance of an ancient gully, which suggest the hominins tried to fend off (or hunt) predators by stoning them. The trail of the little people Short and small-brained, even compared with classic Homo erectus, the Dmanisi people or their immediate ancestors emerged from Africa and migrated thousands of kilometers into Asia. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Donald Johanson, Arizona State University Garvin Grullón Fossils and scientists mingle at the Georgian National Museum in Tbilisi. They set their own course as they left Africa. Researchers had long thought that H. erectus swept out of their native continent in the wake of African mammals they hunted and scavenged. But all of the roughly 17,000 animal bones analyzed so far at Dmanisi belong to Eurasian species, not African ones, according to biological anthropologist Martha Tappen of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The only mammals not of Eurasian origin are the hominins—”striking” evidence the hominins were “behaving differently from other animals,” Foley says.Perhaps venturing into new territory allowed the hominins to hunt prey that would not have known to fear and flee humans, suggests paleoanthropologist Robin Dennell of the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. Tappen calls that an “intriguing new idea” but thinks it should be tested. Checking the types of animal bones at other early Homo fossil sites out of Africa could show whether the mix of prey species changed when hominins colonized a new site, supporting a “naïve prey” effect.Whatever impelled them, the migrants left behind a trail of tools that have enabled researchers to trace their steps out of Africa. There, the oldest stone tools, likely fashioned by the first members of early Homo, such as small-brained H. habilis, date reliably to 2.6 million years ago in Ethiopia (and, possibly, 3.3 million years in Kenya). New dates for stone tools and bones with cutmarks at Ain Boucherit, in the high plateau of northeastern Algeria, suggest that hominins had crossed the Sahara by 2.2 million years ago when it was wetter and green, according to archaeologist Mohamed Sahnouni of the National Centre for Research on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain. His unpublished results, presented at the Dmanisi meeting, are the earliest evidence of a human presence in northern Africa.The next oldest tools are those from Dmanisi, at 1.85 million years old. The trail of stone tools then hopscotches to Asia, where Mode 1 toolkits show up by nearly 1.7 million years ago in China and 1.6 million in Java, with H. erectus fossils. “We pick up little fractions of a current” of ancient hominin movements, Foley says. On a promontory high above the sweeping grasslands of the Georgian steppe, a medieval church marks the spot where humans have come and gone along Silk Road trade routes for thousands of years. But 1.77 million years ago, this place was a crossroads for a different set of migrants. Among them were saber-toothed cats, Etruscan wolves, hyenas the size of lions—and early members of the human family.Here, primitive hominins poked their tiny heads into animal dens to scavenge abandoned kills, fileting meat from the bones of mammoths and wolves with crude stone tools and eating it raw. They stalked deer as the animals drank from an ancient lake and gathered hackberries and nuts from chestnut and walnut trees lining nearby rivers. Sometimes the hominins themselves became the prey, as gnaw marks from big cats or hyenas on their fossilized limb bones now testify.”Someone rang the dinner bell in gully one,” says geologist Reid Ferring of the University of North Texas in Denton, part of an international team analyzing the site. “Humans and carnivores were eating each other.” Meet the frail, small-brained people who first trekked out of Africa Indeed, H. erectus now includes the 1-million-year-old type specimen from Trinil on the island of Java as well as fossils from South Africa, East Africa, Georgia, Europe, and China that span roughly 300,000 to 1.9 million years. “They’re putting everything into H. erectus over huge geographical distances, essentially spread throughout the whole world, and over a vast number of years,” Johanson says.Yet no other species matches the Dmanisi specimens better, Rightmire says. For example, the shapes of their dental palate and skulls match those of H. erectus, not H. habilis. And the variation in skull size and facial shape is no greater than in other species, including both modern humans or chimps, says Ponce de León—especially when the growth of the jaw and face over a lifetime are considered.Though the fossils’ small stature and brains might fit best with H. habilis, their relatively long legs and modern body proportions place them in H. erectus, says David Lordkipanidze, general director of the Georgian National Museum and head of the Dmanisi team. “We can’t forget that these are not just heads rolling around, dispersing around the globe,” Potts adds. Like Rightmire, he thinks the fossils represent an early, primitive form of H. erectus, which had evolved from a H. habilis–like ancestor and still bore some primitive features shared with H. habilis.Regardless of the Dmanisi people’s precise identity, researchers studying them agree that the wealth of fossils and artifacts coming from the site offer rare evidence for a critical moment in the human saga. They show that it didn’t take a technological revolution or a particularly big brain to cross continents. And they suggest an origin story for first migrants all across Asia: Perhaps some members of the group of primitive H. erectus that gave rise to the Dmanisi people also pushed farther east, where their offspring evolved into later, bigger-brained H. erectus on Java (at the same time as H. erectus in Africa was independently evolving bigger brains and bodies). “For me, Dmanisi could be the ancestor for H. erectus in Java,” says paleoanthropologist Yousuke Kaifu of the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo.In spite of the remaining mysteries about the ancient people who died on this windy promontory, they have already taught researchers lessons that extend far beyond Georgia. And for that, Lordkipanidze is grateful. At the end of a barbecue in the camp house here, he raised a glass of wine and offered a toast: “I want to thank the people who died here,” he said.last_img read more

Dam building binge in Amazon will shred ecosystems scientists warn

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country LIMA—Once upon a time, thousands of dorados, a giant among catfish, would swim more than 3000 kilometers from the mouth of the Amazon River to spawn during the austral autumn in Bolivia’s Mamoré River, in the foothills of the Andes. But the dorado, which can grow to more than 2 meters in length, is disappearing from those waters, and scientists blame two hydropower dams that Brazil erected a decade ago on the Madeira River.”The dams are blocking the fish,” says Michael Goulding, a Wildlife Conservation Society aquatic ecologist in Gainesville, Florida, who has been studying the dorado since the 1970s. They are “probably on their way to extinction” in Peru and Bolivia.Most Amazon dams are in Brazil, where scientists have raised concerns about the displacement of local communities and emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane from large reservoirs. But as countries seek new energy sources to drive economic growth, a surge in dam construction on the eastern flank of the Andes could further threaten fish migration and sediment flows, Elizabeth Anderson, a conservation ecologist at Florida International University in Miami, and colleagues warn today in Science Advances. Dam building binge in Amazon will shred ecosystems, scientists warn By Barbara FraserJan. 31, 2018 , 2:00 PM E. ANDERSON ET AL., SCIENCE ADVANCES, EAAO1642 (2018) ADAPTED BY J. YOU/SCIENCE Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe During the rainy season—from November to May—water levels rise in the Amazon Basin, flooding large tracts of forest. Various species of fish swim into the forest, where they feed on fruits—and later disperse seeds. By blocking migration routes or changing water levels, dams change seed dispersal patterns, says Sandra Bibiana Correa, a freshwater ecologist at Mississippi State University in Starkville. The fish-forest pas de deux “is a really delicate interaction,” she says. “It has been going on for tens of millions of years. We can disrupt that very easily.”Some species are taking advantage of the disorder. Another kind of giant catfish known as the manitoa or piramutaba once rarely ventured upstream of rapids that predated the Madeira River dams. Unlike its cousin, this species (B. vaillantii) can make it through both dam bypasses and into the upper reservoir, and from there swims another 1000 kilometers or so upstream to Peru’s Madre de Dios watershed. Whether the newcomer will fill the dorado’s ecological role or prey on different fish and thus skew species assemblages is unclear, says Carlos Cañas, a river ecologist at the Wildlife Conservation Society here, who plans to monitor the migration of large catfish in the watershed.Two other threats—climate change and the deforestation that accompanies road building during dam construction—could amplify the severity of ecological deterioration, Anderson says. At stake, she says, are the livelihoods of indigenous peoples who depend on fishing. Other projects, such as Peru’s plans to dredge rivers to improve navigability, could exacerbate the ecological impact by changing flows, disturbing spawning sites, and disrupting the river-forest connection, says Fabrice Duponchelle of the French Institute of Research for Development in Marseille.Amazon nations should work together to craft a basin-wide management plan for migratory fish, says Thomas Lovejoy, a tropical ecologist at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. “You have to manage the Amazon as a system,” he says. It’s not too late to preserve much of the ecology of the western Amazon Basin, where “we still have a lot of free-flowing rivers,” Anderson adds. “There is a huge opportunity to protect at least a subset of them by thinking at a regional scale.” Email Catches of dorado are in decline as the catfish is failing to navigate two dams on its epic spawning run. MICHAEL GOULDING Parting the waters A new analysis forecasts severe habitat fragmentation in the western Amazon Basin if some of the 160 planned dams are built in the region, where 142 dams are already. For the ecology of the western Amazon Basin, where the mountains meet the lowlands, the main consequence of proliferating dams is habitat fragmentation. Interference with spawning is one facet. Another is that dams hold back sediments and nutrients that nourish the Amazon Basin, Anderson says. Her team documented 142 hydropower dams that are operating or under construction on headwaters in the western Amazon Basin, and another 160 that are under consideration. If even a fraction of the planned projects is completed, the habitat disruption could have a cascade of ecosystem effects with devastating consequences, scientists say.The disappearance of the dorado (Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii) from the Mamoré River suggests fragmentation is already taking a toll. And that’s despite features of the dams that are meant to mitigate their impact. The Madeira dams, for example, are designed to allow fish to pass: The lower dam has a bypass channel and the upper dam has an enclosure in which fish are captured. They are then trucked upstream for release into the reservoir. Perhaps because of variations in currents or water chemistry, dorados are not using the channel, says Carolina Rodrigues da Costa Doria, an ichthyologist at the Federal University of Rondônia in Porto Velho, Brazil. The threat may not be limited to fish: Freshwater dolphins and river otters may also migrate along Amazonian rivers, and how dams affect their behavior is unknown, says Paul Van Damme, director of the Institute for Applied Research on Water Resources, a research center in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Update In reversal science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists

first_img The New York City–based Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) told editors of its roughly 200 journals yesterday that it feared “severe legal implications” from continuing to use Huawei scientists as reviewers in vetting technical papers. They can continue to serve on IEEE editorial boards, according to the memo, but “cannot handle any papers” until the sanctions are lifted.On 15 May, the U.S. Department of Commerce added Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. and its affiliates to a list of companies for which a license is required before U.S. technology can be sold or transferred. The department can refuse to grant such a license, issued by the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), if it deems that any sales or transfers would harm U.S. national security interests. U.S. officials have alleged that the Chinese government could use equipment manufactured by Huawei, which is a global supplier of cell phones and wireless data networks, to spy on users or disrupt critical infrastructure.Huawei scientists can continue to engage in a range of society activities, explains a 22 May IEEE statement to members. They can attend IEEE-sponsored conferences and make presentations, submit articles to IEEE journals, and participate in leadership and governance bodies to which they belong.What they can’t do as an employee of a company on the BIS entity list is be given access to the type of technical information that would be part of a research article. Specifically, IEEE says they “cannot receive or access materials submitted by other persons until after IEE has accepted the material for publication.” At that point, Huawei scientists “may act as editor or peer reviewer for that material.”The IEEE ban has sparked outrage among Chinese scientists on social media. “I joined IEEE as a Ph.D. student because it is recognized as an International academic platform in electronics engineering,” wrote Haixia (Alice) Zhang of Peking University in Beijing in a letter to IEEE leadership. “But this message is challenging my professional integrity. I have decided to quit the editorial boards [of two IEEE journals] until it restores our common professional integrity.”On 29 May IEEE “clarified” its response to the listing of Huawei. Here are excerpts from that statement: Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe *Update, 3 June, 12:15 p.m.: On 2 June, IEEE lifted its ban on using Huawei scientists as journal reviewers, saying it had received “clarification” from the U.S. Department of Commerce on how the government’s recent actions against the company affect its peer-review process.Here is our original story from 29 May:A major scientific society has banned employees of Huawei, the Chinese communications giant, from reviewing submissions to its journals because of U.S. government sanctions against the company. By Jeffrey MervisJun. 3, 2019 , 12:15 PMcenter_img Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg/Getty Images *Update, 30 May, 9:03 a.m.: This story has been updated with a statement from IEEE. Update: In reversal, science publisher IEEE drops ban on using Huawei scientists as reviewers IEEE complies with U.S. government regulations which restrict the ability of the listed Huawei companies and their employees to participate in certain activities that are not generally open to the public. This includes certain aspects of the publication peer review and editorial process.However, all IEEE members, including those employed by Huawei, can continue to participate in individual membership, corporate membership and voting rights; subscribe to and access IEEE’s digital library and other publication products; submit technical papers for publication; participate in and present at IEEE-sponsored meetings and conferences, and may sponsor and accept an IEEE award. Members affiliated with Huawei may also participate in business, logistics, and other meetings including those related to conference planning.Huawei and its employees can continue to be a member of the IEEE Standards Association, including earning or exercising the voting rights of membership; attend IEEE standards development meetings, submit new proposals for standards, and participate and comment in public discussions of standards technology proposals.Should the U.S. government clarify the application of the EAR [Export Administration Regulations] with respect to peer review we will further advise the IEEE community. A Huawei Technologies booth at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, earlier this year.last_img read more

This ancient hairy dragon may have sported primitive feathers

first_imgLuckily, the specimens, now stored at Nanjing University and the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences’s Institute of Geology in Beijing, had not been coated with the protective lacquer applied to many fossils that sometimes obscures details and prevents chemical analysis. Careful examination under a microscope showed they sported four types of filaments: a hollow, slightly curved hairlike filament—the standard pycnofiber—that covered most of the pterosaurs’ bodies; bushy tipped filaments on the neck, base of the tail, and parts of the legs; a differently shaped filament with bushy fibers extending from the middle on the head; and, finally, on the wing membranes of both animals, filaments that seemed to be tufts of branched filaments. “The correct term for a branching thing that grows out of the follicle of the skin is a feather,” Benton says.These feathers, like down on modern birds, might have helped the warm-blooded animals regulate their temperature, the team reports today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. They also could have played a role in flight aerodynamics, coloration, and may have enhanced the animals’ sense of touch, the authors say. An artist’s rendering of the pterosaur based on the new study looks like a fluffy baby dragon—or perhaps a relative of Buckbeak, the hippogriff from the Harry Potter movies.Pterosaurs are only distantly related to dinosaurs and birds, the other animals known to have had feathers. If the newly found structures really are a type of feather, Jiang says, that means the common ancestor of birds and pterosaurs may have had them, which would move the origin of feathers back from 175 million years ago to roughly 250 million years ago. It would also suggest that a broad variety of dinosaurs—including plant eaters not directly related to modern birds—might have also had featherlike structures on their skin. (Some researchers have reported featherlike filaments on these dinosaurs, but those claims are vigorously debated.)But David Unwin, a paleontologist at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, thinks the branched filaments are more likely to be structural fibers called actinofibrils that were part of pterosaurs’ wing membrane. “Whenever we have soft tissue in pterosaurs, wing fibers are always there,” he says. The branches, he says, could be decaying wing fibers that have started to unwind and fray.Jiang, Benton, and their colleagues say detailed studies of the filaments support their theory. Using a scanning electron microscope, x-ray spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy, they discovered the structures were likely made of keratin—the protein that forms hair and feathers—and they found structures that looked like melanosomes, organelles that contain melanin and are also typically found in hair and feathers. (The melanosomes’ chemical composition suggests the fibers were likely brown or red, not black.) But actinofibrils could also have contained keratin and melanosomes, Unwin says.From a genetic perspective, early evolution of primitive feathers isn’t so far-fetched, Benton says. The genes that control the growth of hair, feathers—and scales—are very similar, he notes. “A chicken has feathers and scales on its legs, and a rat has scales on its tail.”Although skeptical about the group’s interpretation, Unwin says the study will help scientists get closer to understanding pterosaur skin. “These are two really great specimens,” he says. “And the imaging studies they did were really, really good. It’s very helpful to have the data.” By Gretchen VogelDec. 17, 2018 , 10:45 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe This ancient ‘hairy dragon’ may have sported primitive feathers Yuan Zhang/Nature Ecology & Evolution This pigeon-size pterosaur, which lived roughly 160 million years ago, had branched filaments on its skin that resemble feathers.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Ptersoaurs—flying reptiles, some as big as giraffes—were the first vertebrates to develop powered flight, more than 200 million years ago. Scientists have long known that these distant cousins of dinosaurs had fuzzy, furlike fibers on their skin. Now, a new study suggests those fibers might have been a kind of primitive feather. That would upend the assumption that certain dinosaurs—including modern birds—were the only ones to develop feathers.Scientists have known since the 1800s that pterosaurs were covered in short hairlike filaments called pycnofibres, which probably formed a fuzz or furlike covering. But no one knows exactly what these fibers looked like when the animal was alive.Michael Benton, a paleontologist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, paleontologist Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University in China, and their colleagues examined fossils of two pigeon-size pterosaurs found at the Yanliao Biota in northeastern China. The site is known for its exquisitely preserved fossils from between 165 million and 160 million years ago, including some of the earliest birds. The two pterosaurs caught the researchers’ attention because they were “exceptionally hairy,” Benton says, with unusually well-preserved pycnofibers.last_img read more

For some multiple sclerosis patients knocking out the immune system might work

first_img For some multiple sclerosis patients, knocking out the immune system might work better than drugs Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Blood stem cells (depicted here, yellow, in bone marrow) regenerated the immune system after chemotherapy in a new trial for multiple sclerosis. Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img By Kelly ServickJan. 15, 2019 , 11:15 AM Email In multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease that strips away the sheaths that insulate nerve cells, the body’s immune cells come to see the nervous system as an enemy. Some drugs try to slow the disease by keeping immune cells in check, or by keeping them away from the brain. But for decades, some researchers have been exploring an alternative: wiping out those immune cells and starting over.The approach, called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), has long been part of certain cancer treatments. A round of chemotherapy knocks out the immune system and an infusion of stem cells—either from a patient’s own blood or, in some cases, that of a donor—rebuilds it. The procedure is already in use for MS and other autoimmune diseases at several clinical centers around the world, but it has serious risks and is far from routine. Now, new results from a randomized clinical trial suggest it can be more effective than some currently approved MS drugs.“A side-by-side comparison of this magnitude had never been done,” says Paolo Muraro, a neurologist at Imperial College London who has also studied HSCT for MS. “It illustrates really the power of this treatment—the level of efficacy—in a way that’s very eloquent.” Nearly 30 years ago, when hematologist Richard Burt saw how HSCT worked in patients with leukemia and lymphoma, he was struck by a curious effect: After those patients rebuilt their immune systems, their childhood vaccines no longer protected them, recalls Burt, now at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Evanston, Illinois. Without a new vaccination, the new immune cells wouldn’t recognize viruses such as measles and mumps and launch a prompt counterattack. That suggested that in the case of an autoimmune disease, reseeding the immune system might help the body “forget” that its own cells were the enemy.Burt and others have since used HSCT for a variety of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. In the past few years, several teams have reported encouraging results in MS. But only one study—which evaluated just 17 patients—directly compared HSCT to other available drug treatments.In the new trial, Burt and his colleagues recruited 110 people with the most common form of MS, known as relapsing-remitting. In that form of the disease, patients can go long periods without symptoms—which include muscle weakness and vision problems—before inflammation flares up. Trial participants had at least two such relapses in the previous year, despite being on one of several approved MS drugs.Half the participants continued with drug treatment but switched from a drug that wasn’t working for them to a drug of a different class. The other half underwent HSCT. First, the researchers collected their blood to reinfuse later. Then, they gave patients a combination of drugs to kill most of their immune cells. In this trial, the patients would have regenerated their own immune systems with stem cells in bone marrow that were spared annihilation, Burt notes. But they received the reinfusion of their own stem cell-rich blood to help speed recovery by several days.A year later, the researchers evaluated how far the disease had progressed in each of the patients. According to a  zero-to-10 scale of disability that includes measures of strength, coordination, and speech, roughly 25% of those in the drug treatment group showed at least a one-point worsening in their score, compared with just 2% of those in the transplant group, the researchers report online today in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).MRI scans also revealed less extensive brain lesions in the transplant group and improvements in a patient survey about quality of life. (Survey scores worsened slightly in the drug-treated group.) Five years after treatment, about 15% of people in the transplant group had had a relapse, versus about 85% of the control group.The two groups diverged “in a massive way,” Muraro says. But he adds that two of the most effective MS drugs weren’t included in the control group. One, ocrelizumab, had not been approved when the study was enrolling participants. Another, alemtuzumab, was excluded because it also depletes immune cells and might have increased the risk of complications in patients from the control group who were later allowed “cross over” and undergo HSCT. That “doesn’t detract from the beauty of the results,” Muraro says, but it means future studies should compare HSCT strictly with the most potent drugs on the market.In the new study, where patients spent about 2 weeks in the hospital, there were no deaths or life-threatening complications. But there is still “a hard core of skepticism” about HSCT among physicians, Muraro says, largely because chemotherapy carries risks of infections and complications. As University of Ottawa hematologist Harold Atkins points out in a cautious editorial in JAMA today, researchers have reported deaths in trials for other autoimmune diseases using the same HSCT procedure. But Muraro notes that the overall mortality rate associated with HSCT for MS now stands at less than 1%.Burt acknowledges the procedure has risks—and that most MS patients likely aren’t candidates. HSCT should be considered for people with the relapsing-remitting disease and frequent relapses, he says, before they enter a progressive phase of the disease, in which symptoms gradually worsen without intervening attacks. He estimates that about 15% to 20% of people with MS are candidates for HSCT.Meanwhile, there’s evidence of growing enthusiasm for the procedure, at least in Europe. A recent survey found a sharp spike over the past 5 years in the use of patients’ own stem cells to treat autoimmune diseases. The source of that spike, the study said, was an increase in clinical centers using the approach to treat MS.last_img read more

Florida Bill Will Allow Armed Teachers Protection

first_imgRepresentative Shevrin D. Jones tried to pass an amendment that would  “have prohibited a teacher who shoots a student by mistake in a situation with an active shooter on campus from claiming self-defense under Florida’s Stand Your Ground law.”Mr. Jones said during a fiery speech, which nearly brought him to tears, “We are talking about black boys and girls who are getting murdered by police officers! There are bad police officers and there are bad teachers.”  Unfortunately, the amendment failed, the New York Times reports. Watch his powerful speech below: Florida , Stand Your Ground Teachers in Florida could soon be armed — and this lawmaker is fighting to protect Black children from the proven disciplinary bias that could soon turn lethal pic.twitter.com/e6QoD8xaXT— NowThis (@nowthisnews) May 3, 2019The Stand Your Ground law protects shooters from prosecution if they feel threatened. Unlike other self-defense laws, it does not require the shooter to try to flee the scene before using deadly force. Race has previously played a major role in determining who gets convicted in Stand Your Ground cases. Shooters who killed a Black person walked free 73 percent of the time, while those who killed a white person went free 59 percent of the time, according to a 2012 analysis by the Tampa Bay Times.Arming teachers sounds horrific and the fact that they will be protected under Stand Your Ground if they “mistakenly” gun down a Black child is chilling. The state of Florida is moving into a tragic directed with their controversial “Stand Your Ground” law. The state will arm teachers and if a child is shot, they will be protected under the Stand Your Ground defense.See Also: Markeis McGlockton’s Family Hopeful As Prosecutor Considers ‘Stand Your Ground’ CaseOn April 25, the Florida Senate approved a bill “allowing teachers in all of its 67 school districts to carry guns on campus for protection,” according to Yahoo. This week the New York Times reports, “the House passed the legislation mostly along party lines, with a vote of 65-47. Five Republicans broke with their party to vote no. The bill, which was approved by the State Senate last week, now heads to the desk of Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, who is expected to sign it.” Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family This is America.SEE ALSO:NFL Players Just Gave Trump Some Food For Thought On Sentencing ReformClark Atlanta University Responds To Over 150 Students Denied HousingPittsburgh Teen Killed By Police Once Wrote He Hoped His Mother Wouldn’t ‘Feel That Pain’ Of Burying Him More By NewsOne Staff Aretha Franklin and Kim Porter A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ In Memoriam: Notable Deaths In 2018last_img read more

How Philando Castiles Mother Is Continuing His Legacy

first_img Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago Rest in Power, Philando Castile.SEE ALSO:Arizona Governor Caught Wearing Nike Sneakers After Blasting Sneaker Company and Colin KaepernickSen. Kamala Harris Still Has Joe Biden Shaken From Dragging Him All Over The Debate Stage Philando Castile , Philando Castile Relief Foundation , Valerie Castile Philando Castile’s mom Valerie: “He lived by the law & died by the law.” #FalconHeights pic.twitter.com/sgs7bdYFlG— Jennifer Mayerle (@jennifermayerle) July 7, 2016But the memories of Philando Castile live on in a number of ways. The school cafeteria worker who was remembered as a role model for the children he served has had his legacy of giving kept alive by his mother, Valerie Castile. It has been through her work that her son’s name has not been forgotten.1. The creation of the Philando Castile Relief FoundationAfter her son’s tragic death, Valerie created the Philando Castile Relief Foundation in his memory to help other families that have been affected by gun violence. The organization provides those families with resources such as grief counseling, housing, electricity or utility bills. According to the foundation’s website, it also assists with meal preparation, financing and funerary assistance. The foundation also does work around the school lunch epidemic.2. Bringing awareness to lunch debt Yanez was charged with two counts of dangerous discharge of a firearm in November 2016 but was subsequently acquitted. Castile’s family was awarded $3 million in a settlement with the city of St. Anthony. White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity Philando Castile’s Mom Presents $8,000 Donation To Help Clear Student Lunch Debts https://t.co/3BcZ2BMIPs pic.twitter.com/enh7OEzJog— WCCO – CBS Minnesota (@WCCO) April 26, 2019 Black boys and men killed by police composite photo center_img Valerie made it clear that her son, who worked as a cafeteria supervisor prior to his death, was passionate about making sure his students were fed. In May, Valerie presented an $8,000 check to the Robbinsdale Cooper High School to help eliminate the debts of over 300 seniors, who would have otherwise not been able to graduate until they had paid off their remaining lunch balances. She also gave $10,000 to J.J. Hill where Castile worked.“This is something that Philando held near and dear to his heart,” Valerie said. “He’d pay for children’s lunch meals out of his own pocket instead of letting a child go hungry that day he would pay for it himself.”In June, Valerie worked alongside Minnesota Rep. Illhan Omar and Sen. Tina Smith to create legislation that would put an end to “lunch shaming.” The legislation would prohibit schools from singling out students for the inability to pay for lunch; the school would be reimbursed by the federal government for the balance. Schools would also be prohibited from publishing lists of students that cannot pay or attempting to collect their meal fees through a debt collector.3. Created Tool Kit To Combat Police ShootingIn March, Valerie teamed up with John Choi, the Ramsey County Prosecutor who charged Yanez, to create a tool kit that aimed to help both law enforcement and the community better asses police shootings and provide data to agencies on how to collect data on racial disparities in the justice system. The kit would immediately assign a prosecutor to a police shooting case and would give that prosecutor four to six months to make a decision about whether or not to press charges. They are also required to release their report to the public and if they decide not to prosecute, they had to provide an explanation to the family. The kit is also designed to promote a connection to the community and help citizens know their rights. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail 62 Black Men And Boys Killed By Police Saturday marked three years since the world witnessed the infamous video of Philando Castile bleeding and taking his last breaths after he was shot by a police officer in Minnesota.The 32-year-old was shot by St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez less than two minutes after being pulled over for a broken tail light on July 6, 2016. Castile’s girlfriend Diamond Reynolds and her young daughter were also in the car. Reynolds pulled out her phone and recorded on Facebook Live and the haunting images of an innocent man’s death would forever be seared into our memories. More By Megan Sims Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignoredlast_img read more

House of Salem Man Hanged for Witchcraft Goes On Sale

first_imgJohn Proctor, convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692, was a respected farmer and landowner in Salem, Massachusetts, before being accused of consorting with evildoers and forcing young girls to touch “the Devil’s book.” His life became the focus of Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible, and he was portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis in the 1996 film.Now you can live in Proctor’s house, just in time for Halloween.Daniel Day Lewis stars in the ‘The Crucible’ (1996).The nearly 4,000-square-foot home, built in 1638, has six bedrooms and two bathrooms and is priced at $600,000. The home is in Peabody, which in the 17th century was part of Salem.Real estate agent Joe Cipoletta said certain parts of the original structure, including wooden beams, are still visible. It has been modernized and includes a pool.The real estate listing is positively sunny: “A grand example of Colonial and American History, the John Proctor House.”Picture of John Proctor’s House in Peabody, Massachusetts Photo by Vin7474 CC BY-SA 3.0“This first period, registered historic home features period detail with the functionality of today’s needs. Large eat-in kitchen with plenty of workspaces. The dining room can accommodate your largest holiday gathering.”However, Proctor and some members of his family fell victim to one of the darkest periods in early American history: the Salem witch trials.Proctor from the beginning was dismissive of any claims of witchcraft in their community.Academy Award Nominee Winona Ryder and Academy Award Winner Danile Day-Lewis star in ‘The Crucible’ (1996)In The Crucible, Proctor is a youngish married man who had an affair with Abigail Williams, a young woman who gathers with her friends in the woods to perform a ritual that will kill Proctor’s wife, Elizabeth. After the girls are discovered, accusations of witchcraft explode and the matter spins out of control, with Proctor hanged and his wife only spared the noose because she was pregnant.In reality, Proctor was 60 when he was hanged, and Abigail Williams was 11 years old. There was no affair between them, clearly. (Miller’s The Crucible was considered a comment on the accusations of Communism then causing controversy in Hollywood and Washington D.C.)Abigail Williams vs. Geo JabobsOne of the Proctors’ servants, Mary Warren, was an early “victim” of witchcraft, saying she saw ghosts. After the Proctors were dismissive of her claims, saying she was a fraud, the growing group of girls accusing townsfolk focused first on Elizabeth and then John Proctor.He was the first male to be charged with witchcraft in Salem.His friends signed petitions and fought for his release, but it was no good. He was hanged on August 19 along with three other men and one woman.Salem Witch Trials.In 1692, among the 141 accusations of witchcraft lodged against the people of Salem, 12 were against the Proctors and their extended family. The others were freed, including Elizabeth, after the governor of Massachusetts put a stop to the proceedings.When the Massachusetts legislature passed a bill in 1711 restoring some of the names of the victims of the trials, it cleared the Proctors of convictions and awarded the family £150 in restitution.According to History of Massachusetts, “Local legend suggests that Proctor’s family secretly retrieved John Proctor’s body from the execution site and buried it on the Proctor’s farm on Lowell Street in Peabody, according to William P. Upham, who rediscovered the location of Proctor’s farm in the early 1900s and wrote a paper about it, titled ‘House of Proctor, Witchcraft Martyr, 1692,’ for the Peabody Historical Society in 1903.”The house remained in the Proctor family until the mid-19th century. Its most recent owner died, leading to its being put on the market.Some people feel that the house, which is on the National Register, should be made into a museum rather than sold to private owners.Read another story from us: Portrait of the Devil? Hidden Image in Vosper’s Famous Painting “Salem”According to the Washington Post, Michael Bonfanti, vice president of the Peabody Historical Society, told The Salem News that the organization is looking into whether it’s feasible to purchase the home and make it a public resource.last_img read more

Yamuna Expressway bus accident Screams didnt stop till we reached hospital

first_img Yamuna Expressway bus accident: Among victims, one-year-old girl, a father visiting son, 22-year-old starting first job The ticket for the AC bus cost Rs 782 each, and it made a stop around 12.45 am at a food plaza. Dileep Srivastava (35) was on his way to Delhi for a meeting and was asleep like almost everyone else when the bus hit a divider. “After the crash, I couldn’t open my eyes but I could hear blood-curdling cries. I could feel the driver trying to control the vehicle after it hit the divider. I don’t know who rescued me or how I reached the hospital,” Srivastava, who escaped with minor injuries, said.At the spot lay blood-stained shoes, scattered mangoes, water bottles and the vehicle’s number plate. The remains of the bus had been taken out by a crane and stationed opposite Chhalesar police chowki.Outside the ICU at Chauhan Hospital in Agra, Madhvi Tripathi (31) sat with her 40-day-old girl. “My husband Arunendra Nath Tripathi was returning from Lucknow to Delhi after visiting a relative… I spoke to him at 1.30 am. We got a call at 9.30 am from the hospital that he was injured,” she said.Hemant Kumar Pandey (66), a retired textile engineer, was returning to Delhi after visiting his mother in Lucknow. At 10 pm Sunday, he spoke to his son Prashant about having boarded the bus. Hours later, he lay on a hospital bed with multiple fractures.“He’s too traumatised to talk but he said he saw a lot of blood in the bus and that the screams didn’t stop till they were taken to the hospital,” said Prashant. Advertising Advertising Written by Somya Lakhani, Sukrita Baruah | Agra | Updated: July 9, 2019 1:16:27 am Related News Yamuna Expressway bus accident: Killer combination- Speeding and dozing off at the wheel Of the 54 people on board, 29 died in the accident — including Riya and Bhanu Pratap. Yuvraj survived with a single scratch on his right toe.The bus left from Lucknow around 10.30 pm Sunday, and was expected to reach Delhi by 7 am.“We were returning from our village in Raebareli after summer holidays. Riya was on my lap and Yuvraj next to me when the bus crashed into a divider and I woke up. I don’t remember anything after that. I don’t know where my husband and daughter are,” said Sunita. For those on fringes of Yamuna Expressway, saving lives a part of life 8 Comment(s) Yamuna expressway accident, accident deaths on yamuna expressway, deaths on yamuna expressway, accidenst on yamuna expressway, indian express The bus had 54 people, including the driver and conductor, on board when the accident took place a little after 4 am.Ever since the UP Roadways bus plunged into a drain on the Yamuna Expressway early Monday morning, six-year-old Yuvraj has barely spoken. Seated next to his injured mother Sunita (25) on the hospital bed, he keeps looking for his one-year-old sister Riya and their father Bhanu Pratap.last_img read more

With paper and a promise a Chinese cafe keeps traditional writing alive

first_imgLee, a Taiwanese who has lived in Beijing for over 15 years, feels young people are losing touch with writing traditional characters. “When you live by yourself, you have to know how to cook, not where to buy food from,” she says, commenting on young people’s dependence on the technology.The opportunity to move to Beijing came via an advertising firm. “One of the advertising firms here had a creative director from Taiwan, and at the time, Taiwanese people served as a bridge between people of mainland China and western bosses or managers,” she says.In 2009, after reading a bad translation of Warren Buffet’s biography, Lee and two of her colleagues launched an online bookshop on the Chinese website Taobao and later set up a physical cafe and bookstore in an attempt to offer books with better translations. “All the books were from Taiwan with characters in traditional Taiwanese. Not simplified. We carefully picked out translations, designs, writers and sold expensive books that are worth collecting and keeping for life,” she says.Over the years, as mainland China and Taiwan’s relations soured and improved across the Taiwan Strait, Lee and her partners moved the cafe — which also offers language courses — three times before settling at its present location. “… I am asked what my opinion is about mainland China and Taiwan’s relations. I don’t have a strong opinion, but I sometimes think the next generation will have the wisdom to end the problems.” Related News Written by Sowmiya Ashok | Beijing | Updated: June 22, 2019 8:45:59 am Post Comment(s) China still ‘cautiously optimistic’ on US trade talks despite new tariffs China: At least 26 killed, 28 injured after tour bus catches fire Xue Li — or Shirly, as she calls herself in English — narrates this at the Classic Code Cafe, in Hougulouyuan Hutong, near Beijing’s Bell and Drum Towers. At the cafe, she hands out sheets of paper inscribed with traditional Chinese characters. Lee explains how different characters evolved over millennia, changing under different dynasties to ease bureaucratic work, and into what foreigners today call the “square language” — each character fitting neatly into a square. Since the 1950s, Mainland China has promoted simplified Chinese characters in an effort to boost literacy.To each customer who gets a sheet, Lee promises that an honest effort to write out the characters five times will see a 10 per cent discount on the bill, depends on whether they are a foreigner, a mainland Chinese or Taiwanese. To The Indian Express, she hands a simple version for foreigners with “zhongwen” written in Chinese – “zhong” meaning “centre or middle” and “wen” meaning “writing”.“I came up with this idea for fun,” says the 58-year-old, who majored in Chinese literature, “Everything on the menu here is homemade or handmade, and it takes a while to serve my guests. So I thought I will give them something fun to do in the meantime and they will forget how long they have to wait for the order,” she laughs. Four British nationals arrested in eastern China China, Beijing, Lee Xue Li, Shang Dynasty, Classic Code Cafe,Hougulouyuan Hutong, World News, Indian Express At the Classic Code Cafe in Beijing. (Express Photo)On a spring afternoon in Beijing, Lee Xue Li hazards a guess about how wizards, during the Shang Dynasty that ruled China, looked up at the heavens to ask if their queen would be relieved of her toothache. They used oracle bones and turtle shells, she explains, making holes in the shell, burning it slightly from below and reading the cracks that appeared. Heaven’s words were then carefully written down. Advertising Advertisinglast_img read more

Scientists want to help restore Notre Dame hoping to make new discoveries

first_img Scientists want to help restore Notre Dame, hoping to make new discoveries in the process Philippe Lopez/Pool via REUTERS Notre Dame Cathedral’s altar after the April fire. Scientists have started an association to help with the restoration process. By Tania RabesandratanaMay. 24, 2019 , 12:45 PM A month after the fire that ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, scientists and research bodies are getting organized to help restore the building—and advance scientific knowledge.At a public hearing held yesterday by France’s Parliamentary Office for the Evaluation of Scientific and Technological Options (OPECST), academics explained how they can contribute to the government’s efforts to restore the cathedral, which was partly destroyed on 15 April.“This catastrophe is, in the end, a privileged moment for research, because we’ll have access to materials that we otherwise wouldn’t be able to access,” said Martine Regert, deputy scientific director of the Institute of Ecology and Environment at the French national research agency CNRS in Paris. For example, analyzing certain isotopes in the cathedral’s timber frame could provide insights about the medieval climate, said Philippe Dillmann, a research leader at CNRS’s Institute for Research on Archeomaterials. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img “There are different levels of science: Some will help the restoration itself, some will serve our future knowledge of Notre Dame, and some will serve more generally our understanding of the behavior of certain materials,” explained Aline Magnien, director of the Laboratory for the Restoration of Historical Monuments in Champs-sur-Marne, France.Some initiatives have emerged from the bottom up, such as the association Scientists at the service of the restoration of Notre-Dame. Founded by six academics eager to help, it now has more than 200 members in many different disciplines—from art history to geophysics, to archaeology and mechanics—mostly from France, but also from abroad. On the association’s website, members publish brief, lay summaries on specific issues, such as 3D modeling of the cathedral and historic fires at other medieval cathedrals. The association also pairs scientists with decision-makers and journalists seeking specific information and enables informal exchanges between scientists. Collaborative program ideas emerge “with disconcerting ease,” said the association’s president, Arnaud Ybert, a historian of medieval art at the University of Western Brittany in Brest, France.Other efforts try to channel scientists’ enthusiasm from the top down. On 20 May, CNRS announced the creation of a Notre Dame task force, led by Regert and Dillmann. With police still present on-site to investigate the causes of the fire, the task force now helps define how to gather and sort materials from the cathedral so that no scientific information is lost, using technologies such as photogrammetry, remote sensing, and drones, Regert said. The task force is also beginning an inventory of existing knowledge and data about the cathedral at CNRS and in other institutions, some of it unpublished and scattered across different formats and media. “Our role is to take stock and gather everything so that we don’t start from a blank page,” Regert said. In the long term, the project aims to identify priority themes and coordinate research across a broad spectrum of disciplines, avoiding duplication, she said, adding that this effort would require money and staff.Some institutions have already earmarked resources for Notre Dame research. For example, the Ile-de-France region’s research network on heritage and ancient materials, together with CNRS and the ministry of culture, will launch a special call for regional research projects, said Loïc Bertrand, one of the network’s coordinators. (He didn’t say how much funding would be available.)Bertrand, who also leads IPANEMA, a research lab in Gif-sur-Yvette, France, dedicated to the high-tech study of heritage materials, added that France’s SOLEIL synchrotron has offered Notre Dame–related proposals a priority ticket to the facility’s 5% of “rapid access” beam time. For example, the research facility could help understand the effects of atmospheric pollution, fungi, and bacteria on materials such as metals, ceramics, wood, and composite materials.The OPECST hearing took place a few days before the Senate examines a controversial draft bill for the restoration of Notre Dame, which French President Emmanuel Macron pledged to complete within 5 years. The bill sets up a national fund to gather donations with exceptionally high tax rebates; it also foresees the creation of a public body to oversee the restoration and allows the government to bypass rules in areas such as public procurement, city planning, and environmental protection. Critics have accused Macron of grandstanding and mistrusting his own institutions, urging him instead to carry out the work at a reasoned pace, within existing rules and organizations. 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7yrold boy drowns in Mumbai drain 3rd such death in a week

first_img Related News This is the third such death in a week in the metropolis.Divyansh, an 18-month-old boy, fell into an open gutter in suburban Goregaon on Wednesday night.BMC officials had called off the search 48 hours later after checkingover 10kilometres of the drain line in vain. On Monday, Dindoshi police filed a criminal case under section 304 A (causing death due to negligence) of the IPC against the officers and staff involved in supervision work of the drainage on the basis of a complaint filed by the child’s father Suraj Singh.Singh, talking to reporters during the operation, had accused the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and other forces of negligence during the search. Advertising By PTI |Mumbai | Published: July 15, 2019 9:50:41 pm Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Mumbai Dongri building collapse: Last body recovered after 21 hours, toll 13 Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Mumbai boy drowns, Mumbai boy drowns in Mumbai, Mumbai drowning, Minor boy drowns, Mumbai news, Indian Express news  The boy, Amit Munnalal Jaiswal, fell in the drain at the Rajiv Gandhi Colony in Dharavi, a sprawling slum colony in the heart of the city, an official said. (Representational)A seven-year-old boy died after falling into an open drain in Dharavi slum Monday, the third case of drowning of a minor in a week here, police said. Advertisingcenter_img The boy, Amit Munnalal Jaiswal, fell in the drain at the Rajiv Gandhi Colony in Dharavi, a sprawling slum colony in the heart of the city, an official said.The incident took place when Amit and his brother were playing near the drain, he said.After being alerted about the incident, the police rushed to the spot and pulled out the boy from the open drainage. He was rushed to Sion hospital, where he was declared brought dead, the official said. Best Of Express Singh had claimed the civic body did nothing about the open gutter despite constant reminders from local residents. On Saturday, a 12-year-old boy died after falling into a water-filled pit, dug for the construction of the CoastalRoad, near Worli.The boy, Bablu Kumar Paswan, had fallen in the pit near the Worli Sea Link on Friday, the police said. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan The crumbling city Mumbai building collapse: As dust settles, cloud of fear hovers over neighbours, ask where do we go? Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Amazon Cloud Cam Joins Burgeoning SmartHome Ecosystem

first_imgRival devices from Nest and other firms offer higher-end technology than the Amazon Cloud Cam. For example, the Nest Cam IQ includes SuperSight technology, a 4K sensor with HDR, close-up tracking, familiar face alerts with a NestAware subscription, noise cancellation and echo suppression.Integration with Google Home is slated for this winter, and the company plans to introduce Nest Hello video doorbells by 2018.Nest recently introduced the Nest Secure alarm system, which includes motion detectors, voice control, and optional remote security monitoring.Despite the increasing activity, the smart home camera’s impact on the home security market likely will be limited until the devices’ capabilities expand, suggested William Malik, vice president for infrastructure strategies at Trend Micro.”Amazon’s weakness in the home security market is the absence of a real person to speak with,” he told TechNewsWorld. Delivery Watch Featured Rivals Amazon on Wednesday began shipping its latest smart home product, a security camera that works with its Alexa personal assistant and Echo speakers.The Amazon Cloud Cam allows customers to live-stream activity inside their home 24/7. It features 1080p full HD resolution, two-way audio for communicating with family members or pets, night vision technology, and sophisticated algorithms that use machine learning to figure out if the stranger entering your house is the building super or a possible burglar.The smart cam, which retails for US$119.99, is incorporated into Amazon Key, which raised a ruckus upon its introduction late last month. The system allows drivers to open the doors of Prime members who want to have packages left inside their homes. Intrusive Tech center_img David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times. Customers using the Amazon Key program will need a compatible smart lock from Yale or Kwikset that allows delivery drivers to enter the home during a specified delivery time window. Users can watch as the driver opens the door, sets the delivery inside, and closes the door.Amazon plans to coordinate the secure home entry system with more than 1,200 different service and delivery companies, including Merry Maids and Rover.com dog walkers.”Intelligent home security devices are likely to disrupt the traditional home security monitoring industry over the next few years,” said Andrew Howard, chief technology officer at Kudelski Security.”Paying for remote physical security monitoring may soon be a relic of the past, as consumers can save money and often receive better service while maintaining the same piece of mind with many of the same home security devices being offered by companies like Amazon and Google,” he told TechNewsWorld.The Amazon Cloud Cam uses the Alexa voice technology to connect with smart speakers like the Echo Show and Echo Spot, as well as Amazon Fire TV devices and Fire tablets, to let users see who is inside or entering their home.Users can watch the video feed from anywhere in the home using one of those devices, or they can watch remotely on their mobile devices using an iOS or Android app. When users are away from home, the Cloud Cam can be set up to send notifications to their phones, alerting them when motion is detected.For an additional subscription, Amazon will support additional cameras in the home and provide increased storage and unlimited downloads. The subscription also allows for person detection, a way to flag human activity inside the home.The machine learning technology can tell when the motion is caused by something expected, like a pet, or by something unexpected — like an intruder.There is a growing market for automated home security cameras, with more than 90 different makers around the world shipping about 10,000 units per year, noted Blake Kozak, principal analyst for smart home and security technology at IHS Markit.The market in the U.S. is currently estimated to be worth about $460 million, and has grown about 13 percent from a year ago, he told TechNewsWorld.Amazon introduced the Cloud Cam as a way to build out its home automation ecosystem, Kozak said. Given the company’s expanding grocery business and the $13 billion acquisition of Whole Foods, this likely is just the beginning of the process.”That’s really going to really let Amazon deliver a more customized home experience,” he said. Despite the increasing interest in these devices, privacy advocates have expressed concerns about the risk to consumers — who might lose control over their private information — versus the benefit of having these devices in their home.The Electronic Privacy Information Center two years ago asked the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Alexa voice technology, and asked the Department of Justice whether such listening devices violated provisions of federal wiretapping laws. Some privacy advocates feared Alexa was monitoring users’ everyday activities.”A lot of tech experts are expressing serious skepticism about [Internet of Things] in the home,” Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, told TechNewsWorld. “The benefits are overstated, and the risks are substantial.”last_img read more