Candidate Profile: Campbell/McCabe

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first_imgWho they are: This year’s incarnation of the annual Zahm House ticket, freshmen Sean Campbell and George McCabe are upfront about their lack of qualifications for the positions but said they still believe they could be adequate leaders for the student body. Campbell is running for president and McCabe for vice president.“We have no real experience to speak of,” McCabe said. “We don’t have a lot of skills.”First priority: After debating whether to prioritize a trip to Disneyland or Disney World, the two agreed their first act in office would be a nap.“We could probably just nap on the way to Disneyland and then just stay on vacation for the rest of our term,” McCabe said.Top priority: Replacing the current alma mater with the “Batman Theme” song.“Coach Kelly is a real fan,” Campbell said. “We know tradition is important and all, but that tune still fits nicely with the standing and swaying thing.”When asked whether they’d push for students to be allowed to sing the “Batman Theme” with the players after a home football loss, McCabe said they were willing to leave that decision to the coaches.Best Idea: NoneWorst Idea: Launching a study abroad program exclusively for Saint Mary’s students in Zahm House. McCabe said it would be open to students of all majors and could enroll students for up to a decade.Most feasible: NoneLeast feasible: Campbell said he hopes to usher in another licensing switch from the new Under Armour contract to Wrangler Jeans. Because of the jeans’ classic, comfortable fit, he said he sees them as better suited for the athletic teams’ needs.McCabe said he is not worried about the 10-year contract with Under Armour because “there are always loopholes in those things, so it shouldn’t be a problem.”Notable quote: “The only thing that would set me apart from the other candidates would be my massive seashell collection.” — McCabeFun Fact: Campbell and McCabe claim to be sponsored by Club Fever. When asked why the South Bend establishment decided to endorse them, Campbell reported that the club representative told them, “Yeah, this looks real.”Bottom line: McCabe told The Observer he anticipates the most challenging part of the job will be the “things that are difficult,” including showing up for work and having to complete projects.Tags: 2014 Election, campaign, Student Body President, Student governmentlast_img read more

Student arrested following break-in

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first_imgPolice arrested Notre Dame freshman Brian McCurren early Sunday morning for allegedly breaking into and vandalizing a South Bend wellness facility, Therapeutic Indulgence, Saturday night, according to a WSBT report and McCurren’s attorney Stan Wruble.“It would be premature to [comment] at this time since the investigation is ongoing,” Wruble, an adjunct law professor at Notre Dame, said in an email to The Observer on Monday night. “…I can confirm that Brian was arrested Sunday and released from the county jail late this afternoon.“It is my understanding that no formal charges have been filed as of yet, despite other media reports to the contrary. I would expect formal charges to be filed soon.”WSBT reported Monday that police arrested McCurren on charges of burglary, vandalism and underage drinking.Kim Miller, esthetician at Therapeutic Indulgence, told The Observer that massage therapist Natalie Harling arrived Sunday for an appointment at the facility and discovered the break-in.“[Harling] showed up at 8:30 or 9 o’clock and noticed that our front door was kind of messed up and our side door was pretty banged up as well, and when she did get in there was powder all over the ground,” Miller said. “… The police went upstairs and they found the guy in the kitchen passed out where he was surrounded by Hot Pockets and Drumstick ice cream.“He had gotten into our freezer and just had a heyday. He was apparently very hungry. There was a frozen dinner in the oven that was burning and the smoke detector was going off.”Miller said the intruder attempted to enter the business, which is located in a “historical house,” from multiple access points.“He eventually got into the house because he tried all of our entrances and couldn’t get through,” she said. “Our Jefferson Boulevard entrance — he took a 100 pound concrete flower pot, threw it trough the glass door and entered our enclosed porch.“There’s a second door, and we lock that, so he couldn’t get through the second door. He decided to take a hammer and beat his way through the wall, an interior wall to get into the place, so that whole wall is just completely obliterated.”Miller said the intruder sprayed a fire extinguisher throughout the building but left the business’s valuables unmoved.“He didn’t damage anything as far as our computers; he didn’t try to get our money,” she said. “Our desk is completely untouched. Basically it was like a rampage. He went on a destructive rampage.”Miller said the man whom police escorted from the building was “completely messed up” and “wasn’t aware of what was happening.”She said the employees of Therapeutic Indulgence had conflicting reactions to the alleged break-in and vandalism.“I think that we were just blown away by how bizarre it was,” she said. “We’ve all been laughing about it because it’s just so insane, absolutely crazy, completely pointless, just mindless destruction.”Miller said Therapeutic Indulgence will continue to operate but may relocate temporarily to the second floor of the Emporium building in South Bend.Tags: break-in, burglary, student break-in, therapeutic indulgencelast_img read more

University to increase tuition 3.7 percent

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first_imgNotre Dame announced in a press release Tuesday that undergraduate tuition and fees for the 2015 – 2016 academic year will increase by 3.7 percent, the lowest percent increase at Notre Dame in 55 years.The increase will bring tuition and fees to $47,929, with average student room and board rates of $13,846 bringing total student charges for the academic year to $61,775, the press release said.University President Fr. John Jenkins thanked parents and guardians of students for choosing the University to provide their students with the best possible educational experience in a letter recently mailed.“We know that paying for college involves significant sacrifice for families, and we are grateful to you for making a Notre Dame education possible for your student,” he said.In the letter, Jenkins cited the University’s 90 percent four-year graduation rate and 97 percent placement rate of graduates, both among the highest in the nation, as ways to measure the value of a Notre Dame education.“But perhaps the truest measure of the value and impact of a Notre Dame education can be seen in the lives of our graduates,” Jenkins said. “In my travels across this great nation and in other parts of the world, it is a source of joy to encounter Notre Dame alumni making a difference in every imaginable field of endeavor. As women and men of faith committed to turning their gifts to the service of others, they give generously of themselves to their families, their communities and the Church.“It is humbling and gratifying how often our graduates credit the education they received at Notre Dame and the people they came to know here with shaping them in profound and important ways for a lifetime. It is this sense of gratitude and connection that accounts for what is perhaps the most active, loyal and passionate alumni network in the world.“We are grateful to you for the giving us the opportunity to learn and live with them.”Tags: Tuition, undergraduatelast_img read more

Alumna discusses struggle with eating disorder

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first_imgAs part of Love Your Body Week, alumna Lisa Clarkson spoke about her struggle with the eating disorder she had during her time as a student at Saint Mary’s.Clarkson said she was diagnosed with anorexia, accompanied by occasional bulimic symptoms. “About eight years ago, a medical professional first diagnosed me with an eating disorder,” she said. “I was 17 then and I truly believed everyone was overreacting. I thought my restrictive diet and significant weight loss meant I was in control, but my eating disorder controlled me for much of my teenage and early adult life.”Clarkson said her eating disorder controlled her life and she found her condition worsening, even when she convinced herself that she was getting better and managing. “To me, an eating disorder is the daily anxiety of breakfast, lunch and dinner,” she said. “It is struggle of being recovered in body and not in mind. I was slowly killing myself, but I continued to lose weight until I found myself in an eating disorder treatment center.”Clarkson said according to the National Eating Disorders Association, nearly 10 million women suffer from eating disorders.“As many as 10 percent of college women suffer from a clinical eating disorder,” Clarkson said. “Studies indicate by their first year of college, 4.5 percent to 18 percent of women have a history of bulimia. Any one of us can be affected by this disorder, regardless of labels, gender, age, race, ethnicity, culture, weight, socio-economic status or sexual orientation. Eating disorders do not discriminate.” Clarkson said as a little girl, she was ashamed of her body and afraid to talk about her body sensitivity. “For as long as I can remember, I’ve always been ashamed of my body and my weight,” she said. “I recall family vacations in Florida as a young girl, laying by the pool in a swimsuit, gym shorts and a t-shirt, sweating under the hot sun because I was so ashamed of my body. I had a sensitive temperament, and was unable to talk about my feelings easily, or anything I perceived to be negative or weak. That, combined with a culture that idealizes thinness, built my insecurities into an obvious habit: eating.” Clarkson said eating disorders are incredibly isolating and that she and her family and friends often neglected to realize the gravity of her disorder. Clarkson said this disorder would follow her as she graduated high school and began her freshman year at Saint Mary’s. “When I went off to college in the fall of 2010, my eating disorder packed itself in my suitcase and moved in with me,” she said. “At the beginning of my junior year at Saint Mary’s, I decided to seek help from a local therapist to heal from a painful break-up,” she said. “One of the most clinically sound professionals I have ever encountered, my therapist quickly caught on to my unhealthy relationship with food and body image. She began to address it during each session with me, but I was convinced I was completely fine, and truly not in any serious danger.”Clarkson said that her therapist pleaded with her to seek residential treatment for her disorder; Clarkson obliged and said she began seeing a nutritionist and psychiatrist, but still her disorder worsened. “The more I sunk into the disorder, the more I lost myself — my smile, my infectious laugh and my deep desire to love those around me,” she said.Clarkson said her eating disorder became so bad, she was admitted to a clinic outside of Chicago where she was treated for her disorder over the summer before her senior year at Saint Mary’s.“Being a patient in an eating disorder treatment center woke me up to all the simple pleasures of life I had deprived myself of when I was sick,” she said. “I was confident I was ready and refused to put my senior year at Saint Mary’s on hold.” Clarkson said while although physically she had become healthier, she still suffered from a severe mental illness that quickly caused to her relapse back into her eating disorder.“My physical recovery was only the first step,” she said. “It takes time at a healthy weight for the brain to heal and the disease to recede and disappear. After two weeks of being free of eating disorder behaviors, I quickly returned to the lifestyle I was leading before treatment.”Clarkson said after her relapse, she was sent to visit an eating disorder specialist. “I then found myself commuting to Chicago up to twice a week to meet with an eating disorder specialist and returning at a very late hour to complete my studies, while my friends were getting ready to enjoy senior year at Club Fever,” she said. “I don’t regret it because I needed the help, but I missed out on a lot of my life because of this illness.” In 2013, Clarkson said she began her long awaited journey into recovery. “I chose to recover in 2013,” she said. “Since then, I have graduated with a degree, made new friends, worked a full time job, become a mom to the most adorable pug and lived a life independent from my eating disorder. Everyday I chose to recover again.”Clarkson said while she has recovered from her eating disorder, she still struggles with body image and the doubt that eating disorders leave in their wake.  “For the past four years, I have not owned a scale, and when I go to the doctor’s office, I simply ask the doctor to keep my weight to himself,” she said. “I did this as a means of putting my own mental health first. I have not stepped on a scale since 2013, until last month. Today, I weigh nearly twice as much as I did in 2013. I wake up each day and choose to live my life free of my eating disorder. I constantly remind myself that each pound is a memory for me — it is my Sunday morning brunch, Friday night dinner with my best friend and occasional ice cream just because.”“I don’t look sick anymore, but there are days when I still feel it,” Clarkson said. “It is with patience and love from those around me that I continue to move in a positive direction.” Tags: Body Image, eating disorder, Love Your Body Week, Mental healthlast_img read more

Basilica choirs to perform Lenten concert

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first_imgTo celebrate the Lenten season, the Notre Dame Basilica choirs will host a concert Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. The choirs will perform two pieces by French composer Gabriel Faure — “Requiem” and “Cantique de Jean Racine” — as well as an opening and closing hymn.Four choirs — the Liturgical Choir, the Women’s Liturgical Choir, the Folk Choir and the Basilica Schola — will perform. Additionally, a professional orchestra will provide instrumental accompaniment.Women’s Liturgical Choir director and organist Patrick Kronner will conduct the choirs for the performance of “Requiem.”Although the music will be presented in concert form, it was originally composed to accompany liturgical prayer, Kronner said.“It’s totally functional music that you would sing at Mass,” he said.Kronner said Faure composed his work specifically for the repose of the dead and centers on themes such as consolation and deliverance.Senior Rosemary Pfaff, a vocalist in the Folk Choir, said several distinct movements comprise “Requiem,” which concludes with a piece entitled “In Paradisum.”“‘In Paradisum’ is just lovely,” she said. “It has ethereal beauty that seems really appropriate for a requiem.”J.J. Wright, director of the Folk Choir, will conduct “Cantique de Jean Racine,” Kronner said. Faure composed the piece for a work by French poet Jean Racine, “Word, one with the highest.” It explores a wide variety of Lenten themes such as God’s mercy and the need for sinners to repent, Kronner added.To match a broad range of themes, the piece features several tonal changes, Kronner said, including a tranquil opening, a powerful development section and a peaceful resolution.“It’s a masterpiece in miniature,” he said. “It’s perfectly balanced. The way it fits together structurally, the way he paints the text — it’s just really incredible.”Sophomore Theresa Rice, a member of the Women’s Liturgical Choir, said she admires “Requiem” for its striking dynamic shifts and how it pairs “large, exciting choral sections” with “softer moments.”Assistant director of the Liturgical Choir Jonathan Hehn said in an email that the concert directors spent weeks planning the performance before the choirs began rehearsals.“Each of us, to varying degrees, has helped coordinate various aspects of the logistics, and those who are conducting portions of the concert itself have done hours of score study in order to be prepared to run rehearsals,” he said.An added challenge, Hehn said, was making time for the choirs to practice.“I’ve observed that the logistics in coordinating a concert in a Basilica with a very busy liturgical schedule can be difficult,” he said. “The choir members, we know, also have busy lives, so a thanks is owed to them for giving of their time so generously during this whole process.”Pfaff said she looks forward to the concert because she views it as a way to serve others.“Ministry through music is a wonderful thing to be a part of,” she said. “It’s a beautiful opportunity to be a part of Notre Dame’s choral tradition during a special liturgical time.”Kronner said he believes listener engagement is key to fully experiencing a concert.“You can just kind of be immersed in it and let the sound surround you,” he said. “[Or] you can sit there with the text just as you would listen to a homily. You can let it challenge you.”Rice said she hopes guests will find the concert to be a chance for introspection.“Music helps me gain a lot of peace, but also gives me an opportunity to lose myself,” she said. “I hope [the audience] has a chance to relax into the music and just let it speak to them.”Tags: Basilica Schola, choir, Faure, Folk Choir, Lent, Liturgical Choir, Women’s Liturgical Choirlast_img read more

Campus Ministry hosts fourth annual Feed Your Faith

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first_imgAnn Curtis A student talks with a priest at Campus Ministry’s annual Feed Your Faith event.“It’s really cool to see all the different opportunities that Campus Ministry offers,”  senior Megan Wilson, a Campus Ministry intern, said in an email. “They are not often all displayed at once. You don’t often get to see all the facets. I often talk about Campus Ministry like a banquet. There is all this rich food to offer, but you have to take advantage of it. Here, you get to see the whole buffet.”Feed Your Faith had 38 tables present for the faith-based groups along with five food trucks and balloons. The balloons were each different colors to represent the categories to find groups. For example, green balloons represented multicultural ministries while yellow balloons signified musical groups. Students who checked-in received a free t-shirt and two tickets to be used at the food trucks and also subscribed to Campus Ministry’s weekly newsletter.Campus Ministry’s assistant director of evangelization Kayla August wanted students to know that faith truly matters at Notre Dame and wanted to give students a time to invest and connect. In this way, she sees a clear connection between religious and academic education.“Part of the educational experience at Notre Dame is to answer the deeper questions of the heart and find where God may be calling us to use your gifts for the benefit of the world,” August said in an email. “The classroom is not the only place you’ll learn. Feed Your Faith is a part of that holistic education. Feed Your Faith gives you a chance to connect to choirs, clubs, service organizations, retreat, pilgrimages and many other opportunities to pursue your continued education of the heart.”Senior Marissa Griffith, another Campus Ministry intern, said Feed Your Faith was an inclusive environment where new students or returning upperclassmen feel comfortable and confident in growing in faith.“I like Feed Your Faith because it’s a total blast of a time and you get to meet people who all explore their faith in such different ways,” Griffith said in an email. “They all have the purpose of welcoming you into the community and making you feel at home.”Collins hoped to attract all types of students to the event, no matter their religious tradition or experiences.“Any student searching for God and even asking the question of if God exists and what role He may play in their life is welcome,” Collins said. “Life is a continuing journey of faith and Campus Ministry is here to help you on that journey. Feed Your Faith puts all the opportunities in one place, so you can if and how you’d like to plug-in.”Student organizations in attendance included Iron Sharpens Iron, Folk Choir, Compass, the Muslim Student Association and groups that promoted retreats and getting confirmed in the Catholic faith.Liturgical Choir member and sophomore Savannah Anez believes that Feed Your Faith is an effective way to promote groups on campus that are not advertised much.“It’s good to come here and get some ideas on things you might have missed out on at Welcome Weekend or even as an older student,” Anez said. “I joined Liturgical Choir as a freshman and it all started here at Feed Your Faith. I put my name on the audition list, and the rest is history. The choir has done wonders to revive my spirituality just because of the music we sing. You never know where putting your name down on a list might take you. It’s all about finding what’s right for you.”Campus Ministry promoted Feed Your Faith on campus through table tents in the dining halls, posters in residence halls, newsletters, social media, the Campus Ministry website and word of mouth. Campus Ministry staff and students who are part of the faith groups represented also wore green Feed Your Faith t-shirts all day yesterday.In addition to Feed Your Faith, Campus Ministry supports faith development on campus through choir concerts, pilgrimages, retreats, speakers, service organizations and prayer opportunities.Tags: Campus Ministry, Feed Your Faith The fourth-annual “Feed Your Faith” took place Wednesday evening on South Quad. The event offered Notre Dame students the opportunity to discover organizations on campus that promote religious growth and community. Campus Ministry and a variety of student groups gathered to share their missions and encourage students to join or learn more about faith.Associate director of communications at Campus Ministry Danielle Collins said in an email that the goal of Campus Ministry is to support students in living out their faith at Notre Dame and beyond. Collins said Feed Your Faith gives Campus Ministry the chance to spread its mission since students organizations from many areas of interest such as social justice, service, choirs and pilgrimages attend.last_img read more

Late Night Fire Destroys Busti Home

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Shawn Sweatman / Chautauqua Weather Today.BUSTI – A Town of Busti home was destroyed by fire on Saturday night.Several area fire departments were dispatched to 2924 Busti Stillwater Rd. around 9:45 p.m.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Fire Investigation Team says the blaze started within the residence due to combustible material being in close proximity to an overheated water pump.Crews from Busti, Kiantone, Fluvanna, Frewsburg, Lakewood, Celoron, Ashville and Sugar Grove were on scene for several hours as they battled the blaze. Officials said no injuries were reported.last_img read more

Sheriff Says Letter Declaring Martial Law Is False, Investigation Ongoing

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first_imgImage by the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office.MAYVILLE – A letter and an envelope circulating in the community that says Chautauqua County Sheriff Jim Quattrone has issued Martial Law was declared fraudulent by the Sheriff himself Wednesday morning.Image by the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office.The letter states that Deputy Jason Beichner released the information as the point of contact for any questions regarding the “Martial Law.” Quattrone released the following statement via the Sheriff’s mobile app:“I am quite confident that Deputy Beichner has absolutely no involvement in this letter. Please feel free to advise your contacts that this is a bad and potentially dangerous prank. We will be investigating and if possible will be prosecuting the individual or individuals responsible for the letter.”“For the record – I am Pro-Second Amendment and believe our constitutional rights need to be protected in all circumstances. This was received in a Town Clerks office who contacted our office. The Town Clerk will be notifying other Clerks of this prank. Should anyone receive such a letter please leave unopened and contact our office and we will pick it up for processing.” Image by the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Sex and the City’s Kristin Davis to Join Fatal Attraction in London’s West End?

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first_imgBroadway vet and Sex and the City fave Kristin Davis is going to go knife-to-knife with Natascha McElhone in the upcoming adapation of Fatal Attraction in London’s West End. According to Variety, the Emmy nominee is in talks to portray the wife of the man who is entangled in an extramarital affair with an unforgiving woman. Written by the film’s screenwriter, James Dearden, Fatal Attraction will be directed by Trevor Nunn and is set to begin previews March 8 at the Theatre Royal Haymarket. Opening night is scheduled for March 25. Star Files Kristin Davis Check out the clip below (SPOILER ALERT) for the finale including an epic bathroom battle between Archer and Close in Fatal Attraction. Hope Davis is ready to get bloody on those white bathroom tiles! Davis will potentially play Beth Gallagher, the role Anne Archer was nominated for an Academy Award for in the 1987 film. As previously reported, McElhone has been tapped to play Alex Forrest, the role originated by Tony winner Glenn Close in the motion picture. No casting has been announced for Dan Gallagher, the role played by Michael Douglas.  Fatal Attraction tells the story of Dan Gallagher, a successful New York lawyer with a loving family. After having a one-night-stand with Alex Forrest, he assumes he can walk away without consequence, but Alex becomes obsessed with Dan, aggressively pursuing both him and his family. View Comments Davis is best known for her Emmy nominated portrayal of Charlotte on TV’s Sex and the City and the subsequent films. She made her Broadway debut in The Best Man and previously appeared in London in The Exonerated. Other notable screen roles include Melrose Place, Couples Retreat, Nine Months and The Shaggy Dog. Fatal Attraction was nominated for six Oscars including Best Picture, Best Actress for Close and Best Screenplay.last_img read more

More E! Than ESPN? Get the 411 on the Bronx Bombers With Our Cheat Sheet

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first_img Mickey Mantle, #7 Played by Bill Dawes Yankee from 1951-1968; Position: Center Fielder Best known for his hitting, “The Mick” worked around injuries and alcoholism to enjoy a Hall of Fame career, including winning the elusive Triple Crown Award (leading the league in batting average, runs batted in and homeruns) and being elected to a whopping 20 All-Star teams. He needed two hands to show off his seven World Series rings. George Herman “Babe” Ruth, #3 Played by C. J. Wilson Yankee from 1920-1934; Postion: Outfielder/Pitcher The Babe joined the Yankees direct from the rival Red Sox, a move that dramatically created “The Curse of The Bambino,” the supposed reason for the Red Sox’s inability to win a World Series Championship for over 80 years. Ruth set the bar as a power-hitter, knocking a record-setting 714 home runs in his career. Ruth made money fast and couldn’t wait to run out every night and spend it—he was a notorious womanizer and smoked up to 12 cigars a day. So, you’re about to see Bronx Bombers, the new play celebrating the storied history of the New York Yankees, but there’s only one problem: You know absolutely nothing about baseball. Don’t worry, theater fans, we’ve got you covered! Read below for a crash course on the legendary players featured in the new show—and would it kill you to delete one of those Real Housewives reruns to make room for Yankees Classics on your DVR? Play ball! Reggie Jackson, #44 Played by Francois Battiste Yankee from 1977-1981; Position: Right Field Jackson was nicknamed Mr. October for his phenomenal batting during the post-season, including hitting three home runs in a single World Series game. The Yankees won two championships with Jackson at the helm and he achieved superstar status in New York—Clark Bar even named a candy bar (the Reggie!) after him. Though he left the team after five seasons, he later returned to work in the Yankees front office as a special advisor. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 2, 2014 Elston Howard, #32 Played by Francois Battiste Yankee from 1955-1967; Position: Catcher Howard made history as the first African-American to play for the New York Yankees. His time with the Yanks led him to four World Series championships and 12 All-Star appearances. He’s credited with the creation of two integral aspects of baseball to this day: the batting doughnut (used to make a bat feel heavier while on deck) and using the pinky and index finger as a more visible way of indicating the number of outs. Thurman Munson, #15 Played by Bill Dawes Yankee from 1969-1979; Position: Catcher Over the course of his 11-year career, Munson was on two World Champion teams, named to seven All-Star teams and awarded American League MVP and Rookie of the Year. Known as the heart and soul of the Yankees, he was the first player to be named Captain since Lou Gehrig. On a day off, Munson tragically died at the age of 32 when he crashed while piloting his private jet. Lou Gehrig, #4 Played by John Wernke Yankee from 1923-1939; Position: First Base Nicknamed “The Iron Horse” for his incredible strength, Gehrig played 2,130 consecutive games for the Yankees, a record that stood until 1995. His durability and hitting skills earned him the title of Captain of the Yankees, with whom he celebrated six World Series championships. Gehrig retired from baseball at age 36 when he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (now commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) in an iconic speech where he called himself “the luckiest man on the face of the earth.” Bronx Bombers View Commentscenter_img Billy Martin, #1 Played by Keith Nobbs Yankee from 1950-1957 (player), 1975-1978, 1983, 1985, 1988 (manager); Position: Second Base Though he enjoyed an 11-year career as a player, Martin is best known as a manager, a title he held with the Yankees on five separate occasions. Exacerbated by his drinking, Martin often came to blows with players and team owner George Steinbrenner over his management of the team. Regardless of his hot temper, Martin had a total of five World Series rings to show for his career. Derek Jeter, #2 Played by Christopher Jackson Yankee from 1995-present; Position: Shortstop Known as “The Captain,” Jeter’s calm attitude and prodigious skills have kept him the leader and face of the Yankees since their new era was launched in 1996. In his time as a Yankee, Jeter has enjoyed five World Series championships and 13 All-Star appearances. Jeter is one of only 28 players in Major League Baseball history to achieve 3,000 hits, a milestone that he reached in 2011.  His penchant for dating celebrities (Mariah Carey, Jessica Biel, Minka Kelly) has made him a tabloid mainstay. Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra, #8 Played by Peter Scolari Active Years: 1946-1963; Position: Catcher Known as one of the greatest catchers of all time, this Hall of Famer’s legendary career includes 10 World Series championships (kind of like 10 Tony Awards), the most of any player in baseball history. Berra is known for his witty Yogi-isms—turns of phrase like “It ain’t over ’til it’s over” and “I really didn’t say everything I said.” He got his nickname from a childhood friend, who thought he looked like a snake charmer, or “yogi” in an old movie. Star Files See Bronx Bombers, opening February 6 at Circle in the Square Theatre. Related Shows Joe DiMaggio, #5 Played by Chris Henry Coffey Yankee from 1936-1951; Position: Center Fielder As a Yankee, DiMaggio hit consecutively in 56 games, a record that still stands in 2014. Also known as “The Yankee Clipper,” he was part of nine World Champion teams and won the AL MVP award three times. DiMaggio’s two brothers, Vince and Dom, were also Major League ballplayers.  DiMaggio was briefly married to Hollywood legend Marilyn Monroe and is namechecked in 12 popular songs, including Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson.” Peter Scolarilast_img read more